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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

Hoard of 1000 coins dating back to English Civil War found in Lincolnshire


The find is currently the largest hoard from the Civil War era in Lincolnshire county

A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a plowed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace.
The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell.
This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war.
A few smaller-scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington.
Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as monumental and says that it was buried early 1643, just months after the war broke out, which is identified by the date of the latest coin.

Undetected:  The farmer on whose land the coins were found never noticed a trace for over 50 years

It contains coins from the reigns of Edward VI, Elizabeth, Mary, James I, and Charles I and the largest hoard from that time in Lincolnshire county.
It acquaints us with fear and uncertainty during that period. The exact reason why it was buried or by whom may never be revealed. A possible explanation could be that it was left by a soldier prior to fighting in the war, but never returned.
During the Civil War, someone could easily support living with only £20 a year.  The total value of the hoard, at the time it was buried would have been £34, which would make it quite a significant sum.
The current value will be determined once a decision has been made whether it will be declared a treasure.

In 2008 a collection of 15 Silver and Gold coins, dating from the same time period, sold at auction for £35,933.

 
                     

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