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Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition

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A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition.
Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectus who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago.

The finder said 'At first I was quite skeptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realized what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.'

The coin is approximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams.  Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo.

The only other known specimen of this coin in in the wo…

109 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

The fruit cake is described as extremely well preserved, looks and smells edible.

A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition, it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.

Robert Falcon Scott and his companions pictured in 1912

Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. 
Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extremely cold climate have assisted in preventing it to spoil.


A delicious fruitcake

It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake along, as it has a high-calorie value which helps to keep energy levels up. The area is known for extremely low temperatures. The lowest temperature recorded is −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F). The annual temperature of the interior is −57 °C (−70.6 °F). In this climate at least 5,000 calories a day is required and even more if you engage in strenuous activity like pulling sleds across the snow.

The cake was found in its original metal tin packaging which corroded with age.

On their journey back to England, Robert Falcon Scott and his entire party perished on 29 March 1912 (aged 43), 150 miles from their base camp and only 11 miles from the next depot as a result of his written instructions not being followed for a planned meeting with supporting dog teams from the base camp.
The search party who discovered Scott and his companions also found plant fossils they collected which prove Antarctica was forested in the past and joined to other continents. The fruit cake along with other items was left behind, as there were future plans to return to the location.   
                
 
                       

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