LATEST NEWS

Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

Image
A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



Unique, perfectly preserved treasure of 300 gold coins worth millions of Euros discovered in Italy


A soapstone pot containing 300 gold coins dating back to 5th century AD has been found in the town of Como, near Milan, Italy following a search under a long-abandoned theater. The Cressoni Theater was opened in 1870 and abandoned in 1997.
New owners of the land on which the theater stands plan to demolish the old building and replace it with luxury residences. The pot with gold coins, along with a gold bar and two other objects which are currently in a process of being identified were discovered in the basement of the theater. The pot itself is a significant find, as it is a unique design, never seen before.
The coins were packed into little stacks and with time latches together, therefore needs to be carefully separated. 27 coins have been successfully separated and all dates to the 5th century, from the reign of Emperors Honorius, Valentinian III, Leo I the Thracian and Libius Severus.


During that era, there was little currency flow in the Roman economic system which makes the discovery of such a large hoard a mystery. It is still unclear whether the gold coins were placed all at once in the vessel or perhaps over a period of time, historians will be using layer analysis to determine this. The treasure was stashed in such a way that it could be easily retrieved and it is believed that it may have belonged to an elite member of society as the site is closely situated to the forum of the Roman city where banks and temples traded and also wealthy people were residing. A further search of the area is expected to uncover more artifacts.

 

                       

Comments