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Thomas Cromwell's 'love ring' discovered by treasure hunter banked £35,000

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A beautiful gold 15th Century ring was found by a metal detectorist near Laude Abbey in Leicestershire. It was found on the land which was owned by the late Thomas Cromwell, who was Henry VIII's advisor.


The striking piece of jewelry represents an early example of a love ring, worn by the wife of married partners, the bond between them symbolized with two natural gems embedded on the front and surrounded by a decoration which may be the representation of flower petals. 
The sides are engraved with leaf patterns.  The dimensions are 19 mm in diameter and 10 mm wide at bezel with a weight of 5.71 grams.  The land where the ring was discovered is now a Christian retreat and conference center and the finder was privileged to receive permission to search the area.



In historical days, the land was initially owned by wealthy Augustinian Priory since the 12th century.  Thomas Cromwell was surveying for land to settle on and found the location with its stunning surroundings impressive. He took…

Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater


A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to their homeland, after serving in his armies, or those of Alexander and his successors.

Metal detectorists have found that the best luck of finding ancient coins in the area is during searches around riverbeds.                 

 
                       

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