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Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition

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A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition.
Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectus who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago.

The finder said 'At first I was quite skeptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realized what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.'

The coin is approximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams.  Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo.

The only other known specimen of this coin in in the wo…

Farmer receives €773,000 for discovery of bronze horse head which rewrote history

Front view of the bronze horse head on display

A search of a farmer's land in Lahnau, Germany became very interesting when lots of bronze fragments were uncovered, the trail of buried fragments lead to a 36-foot well in which a bronze horse head, life-sized, weighing 28 pounds, covered with gold and adorned with golden leaves were found. 
The year 9 A.D marked the event of an ambush from German warriors on three legions of Roman soldiers led by general Publius Quinctilius Varus. The Germans destroyed their enemies, the surviving Romans retreated and set up a northern perimeter along the Rhine River. It was believed that prior to this event, Germans and Romans did not live alongside each other and did not trade either. However, along with the bronze horse head, a complete Roman settlement, dating back to 4 B.C, covering approximately 20 acres with no military buildings and no signs of battle, shows that the Romans were living next to and traded peacefully with Germans for years, right up until the Teutoburg defeat. 
It is believed that after the site was abandoned, statues which stood in the settlement may likely have been smashed and recycled for their metal content as fragments of bronze were found scattered across the settlement. 

Side view of the horse head

Metal was very precious in those days, therefore it is assumed that the horse head did not end up in the well by accident but may have been thrown into the well as part of a ritual ceremony and the statue's head was used to cover the sacrificial offering. The bronze horse head is believed to have been apart of a set of 4 life-sized statues, complete with rider, as there were 4 statue pedestals for life-size statues of riders on horses, also, part of a bronze sandal was found nearby. The farmer on whose land the findings were made received €773,000 and the recovered items are now on display at the museum.               

 
                       

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