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Showing posts from January 20, 2018

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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

Talisman for warding off evil spirits in Middle Ages found in Norfolk

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A  silver gilt cross with size 14mm by 12mm (0.5in by 0.4in) from the 15th Century was recently found by a metal detectorist near Wramplingham in Norfolk.

During the Middle Ages, a feared disease named  St Anthony's Fire, affecting both humans and livestock, which caused dreadful symptoms developed in Europe and soon became widespread.
It was initially believed to be the cause of bewitchment, therefore supersticious people would wear a talisman in the form of a cross in an attempt to ward off the evil spirits.

Norfolk's finds liaison officer for the county's Historic Environment Service, Julie Shoemark said that the symptoms were, amongst others, mania, convulsions, skin lesions and in the progressive stage, gangrene.

The name St.Anthony's Fire came about after the disease broke out in France and hospitals were specially erected to treat victims. Gaston de la Valloire a nobleman of the Dauphiné, was the founder of these hospitals and dedicated them to Saint Anthony (c.251-…