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Thomas Cromwell's 'love ring' discovered by treasure hunter banked £35,000

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A beautiful gold 15th Century ring was found by a metal detectorist near Laude Abbey in Leicestershire. It was found on the land which was owned by the late Thomas Cromwell, who was Henry VIII's advisor.


The striking piece of jewelry represents an early example of a love ring, worn by the wife of married partners, the bond between them symbolized with two natural gems embedded on the front and surrounded by a decoration which may be the representation of flower petals. 
The sides are engraved with leaf patterns.  The dimensions are 19 mm in diameter and 10 mm wide at bezel with a weight of 5.71 grams.  The land where the ring was discovered is now a Christian retreat and conference center and the finder was privileged to receive permission to search the area.



In historical days, the land was initially owned by wealthy Augustinian Priory since the 12th century.  Thomas Cromwell was surveying for land to settle on and found the location with its stunning surroundings impressive. He took…

Mycenaean warrior's burial place with incredibly valuable artifacts discovered in Greece

One of the gold rings discovered in the tomb

A bronze age tomb of a Mycenaean warrior dating back to around 1450 BC was discovered in an olive grove near the ancient city Pylos, southwest Greece.
The grave was inside a stone chamber and the body was buried in a wooden coffin. The skeleton of an adult male was found completely intact. The importance and wealth of this warrior is noted by the large number of objects buried with him.  Among the discovered items are weapons, gold and silver jewels and precious artifacts providing an interesting new insight into history.

The inscribed seal stone

From the size and properties of the skeleton, it was concluded that the warrior was aged in his 30's and had a height of 5.5 feet (1.7m). Several ivory combs may suggest that he had long hair and an ivory mirror that he was attentive to his appearance.
It was difficult at first to determine the date which the burial took place.  Pottery is ideal for dating purposes, but this tomb contained none. However, further finds were made in close proximity of the grave which included pottery fragments and the date was then determined to be around 1450 BC which was the time that the Mycenaeans, from mainland Greece, defeated the Minoans.

The warrior's grave with a sword

Some of the very noteworthy artifacts include a Minoan sealstone which has been named the Pylos Combat Agate. It is 1.4 inches (3.6 cm) in length and has a uniquely carved combat scene on a limestone, of a warrior in the battle against two enemies, one being killed and the other already defeated. Four signet gold rings inscribed with images from the Minoan mythology was also found.

The discovery of Minoan items suggests a cultural exchange between the Mycenaeans and Minoans during those days.

 
                       

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