Latest news

Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

Image
Adam Day is a 30-year-old lorry driver from Yorkshire.  He recently started a metal detecting hobby and is considered to be an amateur treasure hunter.  Never did he consider his newfound hobby would bring him fame and fortune so soon.
During a search on a farmer's ploughed field near Beverley Minster in Yorkshire he came upon an amazing discovery, a 15th-century bishop's ring made of 20-carat gold.  He recalls the moment when first looking at the ring he just pulled out of the ground and realized it was of significant value and says that he was shaking at the thought of what special piece of jewelry was right there in his hands.

The gold ring is skillfully crafted and engraved with St George and St.Catherine as well as several decorative floral emblems. Since Beverley Minster is close to the location where the artefact was discovered, it is believed that it belonged in the distant past to a bishop from the local church. It has been dated  to between 1450-1550.' The medi…

Mystery of the treasures of Oak Island linked to history and old civilations

Left: Sword found on Oak Island   Right: Front view of  one of the discovered coins

Oak Island, located at the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada, has a history of attracting treasure hunters since 1875.   The first person to search the island was 18 year old Daniel McGinnis with help of some friends, their efforts piqued serious curiosity.  After digging few feet down they found a layer of flagstone and the pit walls have pick markings on it. Every ten feet (3 m) they dug, there was a layer of logs.  30 feet later, their manual excavation attempts became too difficult.

Rumors of a "money pit" treasure has been circulating due to the known fact that pirates came ashore at times in the distant past.  A lot of attempts have been made over the years to dig deep enough to confirm the existence of a treasure on the spot, but alas, as a result of too much flooding, it has not been possible.

Evidence of old civilizations reaching the shores of this island have been revealed through finds like a Knight’s Templar coin.  Finds from more recent years includes a Boatswain whistle, dating back to the1500’s and Spanish coin dating back to 1652.

Most recently the treasure hunting attempts by two brothers, Marty and Rick Lagina from Michigan delivered what was believed to be a Roman ceremonial sword, which was given by the Emporer to legion commanders prior to entering battle or when departing on a special mission. It has the representation of the demi god Herculus, which was an important religious figure to Romans and appears very similar to a set of Roman cerimonial swords which were found in Europe.  The theory of Roman origin of the sword has been dismissed due to the uncharacteristic to Roman casting technique and material analysis places it at around the 1800’s, which suggests it may be a replica.  How it came to be that this almost identical sword ended up at Oak Island remains a mystery.

Roman presence on the island can not be ruled out, as related findings places a link to them there through the following discovered on or near Oak Island: Petroglyphs carved on cave walls and boulders in Nova Scotia by the Mi'kmaq people, fifty words contained in the Mi’kmaq language are nautical terms used by mariners from Roman times, a specific plant species named Berberis Vulgaris which the Romans used to season their food for the purpose to prevent scurvy during their voyages and a Roman shield boss.

Shipwreck recently discovered near Oak Island
An iron-hulled Civil War era steamer shipwreck has also been discovered nearby the island recently by crews on the Atlantic Surveyor, a research vessel that was conducting sonar operations. The shipwreck is believed to possibly be the remains of one of three blockade runners which were lost.  
They were used to penetrate the wall of Union naval vessels blocking the port of Wilmington during the Civil War. 
The goal of the Union blockade was to keep supplies from reaching the Confederacy through one of its most important ports and to prevent the export of marketable items by the Southerners.

The size and location of the ship suggests that it may be the Fry. It is in very good condition due to change in dune patterns which means that sand has helped prevent the vessel from wearing down over the decades.  This find is due to reveal more interesting facts and treasures from history.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark

Beginner's luck for 3 Year old boy who unearths Medieval reliquary worth £70 000

Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins