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Gold coil shaped bracelets found in County Donegal, Ireland

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Norman Witherow is a farmer in County Donegal, Ireland.  He made an astonishing discovery of four coil-shaped solid gold bracelets and they are believed to date back to the Bronze Age (2500-500 BC) or even older according to National Museum of Ireland.
The items were buried two feet deep, hidden under a rock, which protected them and was covered with clay.
Their likely use was that of jewelry, but could also have been some form of currency.  Research is currently in progress to uncover more information about them and so far there are no items exactly the same as these found.
It is expected that this golden treasure will be on display at the National Museum of Ireland soon.

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Trove of Bronze Age jewellery discovered in Poland

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Mariusz Sikora was out metal detecting in Lubnowy Wielkie, Poland when his detector signal indicated a deep non ferrous target. On the spot he found a trove of bronze jewellery which dates back to the Bronze Age.
Historical experts from the Galea association confirmed that these items are linked to the Lusatian culture.  Likely it was burial gifts. Bones were not found, as cremenation was custom in their culture, human bones would usually indicate possible human sacrifice.
Numerous caches containing metal work of both bronze and gold have been found throughout areas in Poland, grave sites containing tools and weapons are sometimes seen.
They also said that it is a great discovery. The site could have been easily overlooked, as it is fairly remote and cemeteries of this culture are most often quite large and there were no other graves in close proximity.
There were several pottery fragments too, but it is unclear if the pot was a single piece or if it contained something.

Extraordinary discovery of golden artifacts linked to relative of Alexander the Great

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Several, very valuable and beautifully preserved golden artefacts were discovered with the help of metal detectors at the village of Sveshatari, Bulgaria, 400 km northeast from the capital, Sofia.

The find was made near Omurtag mount where the largest of 150 Thracian thombs of the Getae tribe was found in 1982.  This tribe was associated with ancient Greeks.

The Sveshatari thomb is considered significant and included in the World Heritage List of U.N. education and culture agency, UNESCO, for its unique architectural decor.

The find consists of 264 unique gold adornments and dates back to the 3rd or 4th century BC.
Fragments of a wooden box, containing charred bones and ashes, along with, among others, all gold items consisting of a tiara decorated with animal motifs, a horse head piece,  four spiral gold bracelets, a ring, several female figurines, believed to have decorated clothing, buttons and beads.



















Expert in Thracian archaeology, Prof. Diana Gergova, from the National Archaeolo…