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Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

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Adam Day is a 30-year-old lorry driver from Yorkshire.  He recently started a metal detecting hobby and is considered to be an amateur treasure hunter.  Never did he consider his newfound hobby would bring him fame and fortune so soon.
During a search on a farmer's ploughed field near Beverley Minster in Yorkshire he came upon an amazing discovery, a 15th-century bishop's ring made of 20-carat gold.  He recalls the moment when first looking at the ring he just pulled out of the ground and realized it was of significant value and says that he was shaking at the thought of what special piece of jewelry was right there in his hands.

The gold ring is skillfully crafted and engraved with St George and St.Catherine as well as several decorative floral emblems. Since Beverley Minster is close to the location where the artefact was discovered, it is believed that it belonged in the distant past to a bishop from the local church. It has been dated  to between 1450-1550.' The medi…

Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark


Gilded bronze and silver-plated mounts from a horse bridle have been discovered in the town of of Hørning near Skanderborg in Jutland, Denmark along with the remains of a viking to whom these artefacts belonged to.
The find consists of two cross-shaped fittings and a rectangular buckle.  They are now on display at the Museum of Skaderborg.
Merethe Schifter Bagge, a project manager and archaeologist at the museum said the artifacts are exquisite and so rare that it is considered among some of the greatest archaeological discoveries in Danish history. It dates back to 950 AD which could mean the viking who owned them could have been a confidant of the king and it is believed to be a gift of alliance from the king. This type of bridle was only available to the most powerful people in the Viking Age



















The Museum of Skanderborg archaeologists has secured funding for a full excavation of the area including a huge grave complex, which is unusually large for the time period.

Archaeologists hope to gain new insight about the life, power elite and trading during the 10th century Viking age.The excavation site will be open to the public with daily guided tours by a team member of the archaeology group to enable people to see the excavation as it happens.

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