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Gold coil shaped bracelets found in County Donegal, Ireland

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Norman Witherow is a farmer in County Donegal, Ireland.  He made an astonishing discovery of four coil-shaped solid gold bracelets and they are believed to date back to the Bronze Age (2500-500 BC) or even older according to National Museum of Ireland.
The items were buried two feet deep, hidden under a rock, which protected them and was covered with clay.
Their likely use was that of jewelry, but could also have been some form of currency.  Research is currently in progress to uncover more information about them and so far there are no items exactly the same as these found.
It is expected that this golden treasure will be on display at the National Museum of Ireland soon.

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Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark


Gilded bronze and silver-plated mounts from a horse bridle have been discovered in the town of of Hørning near Skanderborg in Jutland, Denmark along with the remains of a viking to whom these artefacts belonged to.
The find consists of two cross-shaped fittings and a rectangular buckle.  They are now on display at the Museum of Skaderborg.
Merethe Schifter Bagge, a project manager and archaeologist at the museum said the artifacts are exquisite and so rare that it is considered among some of the greatest archaeological discoveries in Danish history. It dates back to 950 AD which could mean the viking who owned them could have been a confidant of the king and it is believed to be a gift of alliance from the king. This type of bridle was only available to the most powerful people in the Viking Age



















The Museum of Skanderborg archaeologists has secured funding for a full excavation of the area including a huge grave complex, which is unusually large for the time period.

Archaeologists hope to gain new insight about the life, power elite and trading during the 10th century Viking age.The excavation site will be open to the public with daily guided tours by a team member of the archaeology group to enable people to see the excavation as it happens.

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