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Britain's largest gold nugget

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Vincent Thurkettle from Somerset, South West England is a dedicated treasure hunter and gold prospector who now holds the record of finding the largest gold nugget in the U.K, weighing 97.12 grams (3 oz).
The find was made in 2012 near the shipwreck of the Royal Charter, off the coast of Anglesey,  Northwest Wales, but kept a secret until recently to allow him to search the area thoroughly, undisturbed.
At age 16 Vincent left school and trained as a Chartered Forester, following his studies worked for the Forestry Commission.  He had a keen interest in treasure hunting, also wanted to write a book and in 2005, after filling the position of Deputy Director, decided to retire from his job to pursue his dreams, which he both full filled by making several very valuable finds and writing a book named The Wood Fire Handbook.
He describes his passion for treasure hunting: “Every little speck  of gold I’ve found around the world has been a thrill – the campfires I’ve sat around, the people I…

Talisman for warding off evil spirits in Middle Ages found in Norfolk

St.Anthony.
A  silver gilt cross with size 14mm by 12mm (0.5in by 0.4in) from the 15th Century was recently found by a metal detectorist near Wramplingham in Norfolk.

During the Middle Ages, a feared disease named  St Anthony's Fire, affecting both humans and livestock, which caused dreadful symptoms developed in Europe and soon became widespread.
It was initially believed to be the cause of bewitchment, therefore supersticious people would wear a talisman in the form of a cross in an attempt to ward off the evil spirits.

Norfolk's finds liaison officer for the county's Historic Environment Service, Julie Shoemark said that the symptoms were, amongst others, mania, convulsions, skin lesions and in the progressive stage, gangrene.

The name St.Anthony's Fire came about after the disease broke out in France and hospitals were specially erected to treat victims. Gaston de la Valloire a nobleman of the Dauphiné, was the founder of these hospitals and dedicated them to Saint Anthony (c.251-356) who was one of the earliest monks and considered the founder and father of organized Christian monasticism, who's rule represented one of the first attempts to codify guidelines for monastic living.  Monks from the Order of St.Anthony treated people infected with the disease in those hospitals.

The word "fire" refers to the burning sensations people experienced during the gangrenous stage of the disease.

 It was not until 1670 that a French physician, Dr. Thuillier discovered the cause after realizing it was not contagious. It was caused by a fungus infection in Rye named Ergot and spread to humans through consumption.
Rye bread was very popular during that time amongst poor and middle class people.  The name of the disease was changed to Ergotism.
The latest outbreak of Ergotism has been reported in 1951, in a French village called Pont Saint Esprit.  About 1 in 20 people in the village of 4000 contracted the disease, as the cause is known, it was possible to halt it's progression.

The medieval cross was declared a treasure and Norwich Castle Museum hopes to buy it for display.


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