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Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

Rare and valuable pendant of high quality gold found in Norfolk

The front features an image of Emperor Justinian.
Back view of the gold pendant.


Definitely not a gold bottle top.
Mr. Godfrey Pratt from Norfolk made a rare and valuable discovery on a field near Attleborough,with his metal detector.  At first he thought it may be just a golden bottle cap, but upon uncovering it more,  discovered a pendant made of high quality gold in a good condidition, dating back to the 6th Century.
Made more than 1,500 years ago, this early Anglo-Saxon pendant features the image of Emperor Justinian as it appeared on Byzantine coin. 
Finds officer Dr. Adrian Marsden from Norwich Castle Museum said it was originally made in France, may have come to England as result of an export trade at the time and that the jewellery likely had a special significance to the owner and was buried with them.
It could possibly indicate a cemetery on the field where it was found and Mr. Pratt joined a search project lead by a team from the Norfolk Heritage Recovery Group.
The pendant is due for valuation by the British museum, following evaluation by the coroner, after which Mr. Pratt will be rewarded for the find.  Mr Pratt is an experienced metal detectorist and has made other finds of archaeological interest.

A similar pendant (pictured left), which was declared a treasure in 2013, was discovered by another metal detectorist on land at North Elmham.
It is aproximately the size of a modern penny and an imitation of a gold solidus coin featuring emperor Maurice Tiberius (582-602 AD).
This pendant is also believed to have entered England from it's origin in France and buried with it's owner.

Both pendants were made into jewellery following their arrival in England and belonged to wealthy people.

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