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Thomas Cromwell's 'love ring' discovered by treasure hunter banked £35,000

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A beautiful gold 15th Century ring was found by a metal detectorist near Laude Abbey in Leicestershire. It was found on the land which was owned by the late Thomas Cromwell, who was Henry VIII's advisor.


The striking piece of jewelry represents an early example of a love ring, worn by the wife of married partners, the bond between them symbolized with two natural gems embedded on the front and surrounded by a decoration which may be the representation of flower petals. 
The sides are engraved with leaf patterns.  The dimensions are 19 mm in diameter and 10 mm wide at bezel with a weight of 5.71 grams.  The land where the ring was discovered is now a Christian retreat and conference center and the finder was privileged to receive permission to search the area.



In historical days, the land was initially owned by wealthy Augustinian Priory since the 12th century.  Thomas Cromwell was surveying for land to settle on and found the location with its stunning surroundings impressive. He took…

Rare and valuable pendant of high quality gold found in Norfolk

The front features an image of Emperor Justinian

Mr. Godfrey Pratt from Norfolk made a rare and valuable discovery on a field near Attleborough, with his metal detector.  At first, he thought it may be just a golden bottle cap, but upon uncovering it more,  discovered a pendant made of high-quality gold in a good condition, dating back to the 6th Century.
Made more than 1,500 years ago, this early Anglo-Saxon pendant features the image of Emperor Justinian as it appeared on Byzantine coin. 
Finds officer Dr. Adrian Marsden from Norwich Castle Museum said it was originally made in France, may have come to England as result of an export trade at the time and that the jewelry likely had a special significance to the owner and was buried with them.
It could possibly indicate a cemetery on the field where it was found and Mr. Pratt joined a search project lead by a team from the Norfolk Heritage Recovery Group.
The pendant is due for valuation by the British Museum, following evaluation by the coroner, after which Mr. Pratt will be rewarded for the find.  Mr Pratt is an experienced metal detectorist and has made other finds of archaeological interest.




A similar pendant (pictured left), which was declared a treasure in 2013, was discovered by another metal detectorist on land at North Elmham.
It is approximately the size of a modern penny and an imitation of a gold solidus coin featuring emperor Maurice Tiberius (582-602 AD).
This pendant is also believed to have entered England from it's origin in France and buried with it's the owner.

Both pendants were made into jewelry following their arrival in England and belonged to wealthy people.

 
                       

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