LATEST NEWS

Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition

Image
A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition.
Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectus who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago.

The finder said 'At first I was quite skeptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realized what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.'

The coin is approximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams.  Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo.

The only other known specimen of this coin in in the wo…

Beginner's luck for 3 Year old boy who unearths Medieval reliquary worth £70 000



3 Year old James Hyatt from Billericay, Essex wanted to join his father and grandfather metal detecting and a trip planned out on a field in Hockley, Essex seemed like as perfect opportunity as any to have his first ever try at treasure hunting.

Within minutes of taking hold of the metal detector, there was a distinctive beep, indicating a non-ferrous target buried in the ground. He started digging and much to the astonishment of everyone unearthed a gold locket which was not a modern piece of jewelry. 
Experts identified it as a reliquary and dated it to the era of Henry VIII (early 16th century), the engraving is a type which was popular during that time.

Medieval Christians believed in the power of relics, any physical remains of what was considered a holy site or person and any object which they had contact with. Anything touched by Christ or his apostles were considered to have healing powers and since Saints were believed to provide a spiritual link between life and death and acts as an advocate for humankind in heaven, effectively, between man and God, anything related to them were believed to provide the same. These items were considered to be so valuable that some were even stolen by one church and placed in another.

Since the Relics were considered of such high value, it was only appropriate that they be stored for protection and displayed in containers known as Reliquaries and crafted of and/or covered by precious material such as gold, silver and gems.
They were often engraved with narrative scenes from the life of Saints, whose remains may have been contained within. At times the decoration was not related to a specific saint or community, but that of general themes about Christian faith, which made them appropriate to be widely used in any community. 
They were sometimes created specifically for privileged individuals, usually wealthy people or purchased by them and the one James found would have been worn around the neck of such person. Reliquaries created for both churches and private individuals were destroyed by enemies of the church during times of religious and political conflict. They are very rare. Only three other similar ones as that which was unearthed in Hockley are known to have survived.


Made of 73 per cent gold, 1 inch wide and 1.3 inches long, the front has an engraved image of a female Saint which is believed to be Saint Helena, mother of Constantine clutching a cross and the back features the presentation of blood droplets from 4 cut wounds and a heart with a cut in it, representing the 5 wounds of Christ.
The names of the Three Wise Men, Iaspar, Melcior and Baltasar are inscribed on three different sides. The back part is a panel for the purpose of sliding out to place a relic inside.
The panel was stuck and had to be very carefully pried open, once opened revealed that the item, which was supposed to be contained within, was missing.
How this artifact ended up with its contents missing and detached from the chain and buried in the earth is a mystery.
It has been declared a treasure and purchased by the British Museum for £70000. The proceeds of its sale will be shared between James’s family and the landowner.

 

                       

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark

Medieval ring found in Robin Hood's Sherwood Forrest.

Long lost treasure of gold coins discovered on the coast of Namibia

Thomas Cromwell's 'love ring' discovered by treasure hunter banked £35,000

Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

Extraordinary discovery of golden artifacts linked to relative of Alexander the Great

Largest hoard of Roman coins - Wold Newton Hoard.

Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater