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Showing posts from October 26, 2017

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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

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Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on muddy, plowed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serve as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600s to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660s.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in whose honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may refer to death itself.
The…