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Showing posts from September 19, 2017

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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

18 Ounce gold nugget worth more than $70000 found

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Oscar Espinoza, of Modesto, California was out with his metal detector in a woods creek in Jamestown when he struck gold.  He uncovered an 18-ounce nugget. The estimated value is $70,000.  The find has been placed somewhere away from his residence for safekeeping until it will be sold.
Bryant Shock, a local business owner, said it was a rare find and he believes it will spark collectors' interest, resulting in driving the price up four or five times.
The nugget is more valuable in its original form because it's a piece of history and if it is melted down, only the metal will make up its value.

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered

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British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back, it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewelry was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valuation by the British Museum.  Half of the money will be paid to Mr. Sansom and the other half to the landowner of the field where it was found.