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Showing posts from September 17, 2017

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Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

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37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags were buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings. The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.   Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong shaped …

18 Ounce gold nugget worth more than $70000 found

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Oscar Espinoza, of Modesto, California was out with his metal detector in a woods creek in Jamestown when he struck gold.  He uncovered an 18 ounce nugget. The estimated value is $70,000.  The find has been placed somewhere away from his residence for safekeeping until it will be sold.
Bryant Shock, a local business owner, said it was a rare find and he believes it will spark collectors' interest, resulting in driving the price up four or five times.
The nugget is more valuable in it's original form because it's a piece of history and if it is melted down, only the metal will make up it's value.

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered

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Lee Sansom, an HGV driver from Saltney, Chesire made the discovery of a lifetime while metal detecting with his father in a group of 20 metal detectorists on a field in Farndon. At first he thought it was just a piece of junk, but as he cleared more of the mud from the find he soon realized it was of ancient origin and far more significant value.

British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewellery was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valua…

Two rare Viking coins found in Northern Ireland

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Mr. Brian Morton, a full-time carer from Moneymore, was treasure hunting on a farmland in Newcastle, County Down when he discovered two rare Viking coins. These coins are a rare type of Hiberno-Manx, mainly circulated in the Isle of Man during the eleventh century and made of 93% silver.
It is the first of their kind to be found in Northen Ireland. Experts believe they may have been dispossessed during a Viking raid on a monastery at Maghera.

Vikings commenced their attacks on Ireland around 800 AD, where they stayed until 1169, up to the time of the Norman invasion. Taking in to consideration that the coins were found at a location with no significant landmark or indicator and 5 feet (1.5m) apart, it is suggested by a former coin curator at the Ulster Museum that they were dropped and not deliberately buried. The Belfast authorities officially declared the coins as a treasure and they have been sent to the British Museum for valuation. National Museums Northern Ireland and Uls…

Hidden trunk of World War 2 soldier found

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A trunk containing the perfectly preserved possesions and uniform of a Nazi German soldier fighting on the Eastern Front has been unearthed in Nevsky Pyatachok, Russia.
Among some of the possessions found in the trunk are alcohol, cigars, uniform, shoes and a wallet with German currency.
Historians will be working on determining who the owner is and tracking down their relatives. This can be difficult and time consuming task.
 Nazi Germany declared war on Russia and began it’s invasion, breaking a non-aggression pact.
This war on the Eastern Front lasted until 1945.