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Showing posts from September 15, 2017

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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

Bronze Roman statue ear found near Dere street

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A three inches (eight centimeters) long ear from a life-size bronze Roman statue has been unearthed by a metal detectorist in the village of Brompton-on-Swale, close to a Roman fort and settlement Cataractonium, today is known as Catterick, North Yorkshire and was confirmed to date back to 200AD (1800 years old). Experts believe it broke off during transport and was never recovered to be refitted. It is one of the oldest relics of its kind ever found in Britain, incredibly rare, very detailed and of high-level craftsmanship.


The find was made near Dere street, which is a road built by the ancient Romans, the A1 runs alongside it today.
The Roman relic was documented with a recorder of archaeological objects found by members of the public named the Portable Antiquities Scheme.
 It was sold for £1100 on auction.