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Showing posts from September 4, 2017

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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

Largest hoard of Roman coins - Wold Newton Hoard.

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Mr. David Blakey from Hartlepool, United Kingdom, discovered the largest hoard of Roman coins one morning while he was searching on a field in Wold Newton, East Yorkshire.  He almost did not make the discovery, as he was just about to go for lunch and a rest following an unproductive morning, when his metal detector sounded as it was moving over the target.

Named the Wold Newton Hoard, it contains an astonishing 1.857 Roman coins and dates around 307 CE, featuring coins representing Constantius and also the first coins to proclaim his son, Constantine, Augustus following his instatement as emperor of York.

The haul is believed to have been the equivalent of an annual salary for a Roman soldier in that era.  It has been evaluated to be worth £44,200 today.

The curator of numismatics at the Yorkshire Museum, Mr. Andrew Woods, said that the find is absolutely stunning and has an irrefutable connection to one of the most significant periods in the Roman history of York.  
This was a crucial t…