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Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

Largest hoard of Bronze Age axes found in Norway.

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Joakim and Jørgen Korstad, brothers from Stjørdal in Norway found nine socketed axes, a spearhead, a casting mould and fragment of a bronze lur while metal detecting in a field in the village of Hegra, 44 km east of Trondheim, which lead to the discovery of 30 Bronze age artefacts  which dates around 1100-500 BCE (aproximately 3000 years ago).


Mr. Merete Moe Henriksen who is the archaeologist and researcher at NTNU's Department of Archaeology and Cultural History says the discovery contained spearheads and 24 axe heads in good condition which is one of the largest hoards of the kind ever found in Norway.
The reason why these objects were buried together has not been determined yet, but the archaeologist, Mr. Hendriksen, suggested possibilities are as a part of a religious sacrifice or temporary cache with the intention to recast the metal later on.
The artifacts will be displayed in a local museum in Stjørdal.


Boy finds World War II plane and pilot in Denmark.

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14 year old Daniel Rom Kristiansen from Birkelse, Denmark, put his metal detector to work a made a remarkable discovery after his father shared a memory of a story his grandfather told him about his family making Christmas cookies in December 1944 when a World War II plane which crashed on their farmland.

Daniel's father, an agricultural worker, having never in 40 years, neither his relatives who have worked on the land for decades seen any evidence to suspect the plane was still on the property, believed the wreckage had been removed years before, but Daniel decided he wanted to search the field any way. A signal sounded and they uncovered some metal fragments, but realized they will need to dig much deeper and borrowed an excavator  from a neighbor.  A few meters down there were thousands of metal pieces, which initially did not represent a plane, more digging revealed the motor of an engine from a Bf 109 Messerschmitt plane, Luftwaffe munitions, then the skeleton of the pilo…

1000-year-old unique medieval treasure.

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Mr. Peter Fergus, from Devon discovered this unique artefact, which was officially declared a treasure.

Dating between the sixth and 11th centuries, nothing alike has been found before.
Decribed as a very small lid of a gilded silver box with dimentions of 30mm (1.2") long, 15mm (0.6") wide, 8mm (0.3") high and weighs 11.29g (0.4oz).
Experts believe boxes like these were used to protect physical remains of religious figures or saints, such as bones, pieces of
clothing, or other objects like a piece of a holy cross.

The item was unearthed around nine inches (23cm) in the ground on farmland at nearby Wembury.


Oldest Iron Age gold jewellery found in Britain - Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs.

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Mark Hambleton and Joe Kania uncovered three gold necklaces and one bracelet in Staffordshire. The collection has been named the Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs and believed to be around 2500 years old.  It features some earliest Celtic art ever discovered.

The items were found close together, the reason why they were buried is not known, possibilities are an act of remembrance after their owner died, for safekeeping or and offering to the gods.

Dr. Julia Farley, curator of British & European Iron Age collections for the British Museum says that the torcs were probably worn by wealthy and powerful women.
Piecing together how these objects came to be carefully buried in the Staffordshire field will provide invaluable insight into life in Iron Age Britain.                                                                                      


Medieval ring found in Robin Hood's Sherwood Forrest.

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Estimated to be worth £70 000, this medieval ring was discovered by Mr.Mark Thompson in the famous Nottinghamshire woodland.  It is believed to date from 14th century.
The gold ring, with a precious blue sapphire embedded, has the image of an infant Christ engraved on one side and that of a Saint on the other.


A regional finds liaison officer, Dot Boughton, confirmed that the case has been referred to the coroner to be formally declared a treasure, following tests at the British Museum.  Mr. Thompson says that he found the ring within 20 minutes while searching with his metal detector in the forrest and making this find could completely change his life.

Gold and silver coins hoard and medieval ring.

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Mr. Cliff Massey from Wrexham discovered a hoard of three 23 carat gold and twenty-five silver coins in a field in Bronington.  They were buried or lost together after 1465 and are from the reign of Edward III, Richard II, Henry VI. On the same field in 2014, Mr.Massey found a gold ring with cabochon blue sapphire, dating from the 15th century.



These items are estimated to be worth thousands and have been declared a treasure. The coins and medieval ring are currently at the National Museum of Wales but Wrexham County Borough Museum hopes to acquire them.

Largest hoard of Roman coins - Wold Newton Hoard.

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Mr. David Blakey from Hartlepool, United Kingdom, discovered the largest hoard of Roman coins one morning while he was searching on a field in Wold Newton, East Yorkshire.  He almost did not make the discovery, as he was just about to go for lunch and a rest following an unproductive morning, when his metal detector sounded as it was moving over the target.

Named the Wold Newton Hoard, it contains an astonishing 1.857 Roman coins and dates around 307 CE, featuring coins representing Constantius and also the first coins to proclaim his son, Constantine, Augustus following his instatement as emperor of York.

The haul is believed to have been the equivalent of an annual salary for a Roman soldier in that era.  It has been evaluated to be worth £44,200 today.

The curator of numismatics at the Yorkshire Museum, Mr. Andrew Woods, said that the find is absolutely stunning and has an irrefutable connection to one of the most significant periods in the Roman history of York.  
This was a crucial t…