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Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

Hoard of 1000 coins dating back to English Civil War found


The find is currently the largest hoard from the Civil War era in Lincolnshire county

A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a ploughed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace.
The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell.
This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war.
A few smaller scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington.
Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as monumental and says that it was buried early 1643, just months after the war broke out, which is identified by the date of the latest coin.

Undetected:  The farmer on who's land the coins were found never noticed a trace for over 50 years

It contains coins from the reigns of Edward VI, Elizabeth, Mary, James I, and Charles I and the largest hoard from that time in Lincolnshire county.
It acquaints us with the fear and uncertainty during that period. The exact reason why it was buried or by whom may never be revealed. A possible explanation could be that it was left by a soldier prior to fighting in the war, but never returned.
During the Civil War someone could easily support a living with only £20 a year.  The total value of the hoard, at the time it was buried would have been £34, which would make it quite a significant sum.
The current value will be determined once a decision has been made whether it will be declared a treasure.

In 2008 a collection of 15 Silver and Gold coins, dating from the same time period, sold at auction for £35,933.

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