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Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

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A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

Discovered: More than a hundred foreign coins from various countries.

Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewelry.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Robert's friend, Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with him when he noticed him still on the same spot for more than an hour, consistently pulling large amounts of coins, which is very unusual.

Beachcombing

The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.

Galveston beach, where the coins were discovered.  Photo credit:  Ellen Yeates

He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search, it was found that days prior, Peter Grasso, member of the Galveston Facebook group, made a post alerting the public that his property had been burgled. Among the stolen items was a TV, gun, and collection of foreign coins.
After making a connection, he arranged a meeting and Peter Grasso identified the coins as his.
Hodsdon usually keeps items found on the beach, but says that he is happy that he could reunite the coins with its owner.
The reason why the burglar discarded them on the beach is uncertain. The other items stolen from the property has not been recovered.

 
                       

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