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Solid gold artifacts found on a farm in Russia, suggests Scythian ritual grounds location

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The Scythians were Eurasian nomads, who traveled the continental landmass of Europe and Asia from about 9th century BC up until the 4th century ADThey were known as great horsemen, warriors, and invaders, therefore portrayed as such on artifacts discovered throughout time, an example of which is a gold comb, dating to the late 5th to earth 4th century B.C found in a royal tomb of Solokha, Eastern Ukraine.

Separate tribes spoke the same language and were united in some ways, but not believed to be governed by one body.  Historic finds reveal that separate tribes had, for example, differences in their artistic expression as well as burial practices. They also had no written language. Being constantly on the move left no traces of settlement. Most of what we know today about them are from writings of other cultures of which the main source is the Greeks. The word Scythian was first used by the Greek historian Herodotus.


About 30 miles east of Stavropol, stands a burial mound, called a kurg…

Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

Discovered: More than a hundred foreign coins from various countries.

Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewelry.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Robert's friend, Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with him when he noticed him still on the same spot for more than an hour, consistently pulling large amounts of coins, which is very unusual.

Beachcombing

The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.

Galveston beach, where the coins were discovered.  Photo credit:  Ellen Yeates

He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search, it was found that days prior, Peter Grasso, member of the Galveston Facebook group, made a post alerting the public that his property had been burgled. Among the stolen items was a TV, gun, and collection of foreign coins.
After making a connection, he arranged a meeting and Peter Grasso identified the coins as his.
Hodsdon usually keeps items found on the beach, but says that he is happy that he could reunite the coins with its owner.
The reason why the burglar discarded them on the beach is uncertain. The other items stolen from the property has not been recovered.

 
                       

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