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Thomas Cromwell's 'love ring' discovered by treasure hunter banked £35,000

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A beautiful gold 15th Century ring was found by a metal detectorist near Laude Abbey in Leicestershire. It was found on the land which was owned by the late Thomas Cromwell, who was Henry VIII's advisor.


The striking piece of jewelry represents an early example of a love ring, worn by the wife of married partners, the bond between them symbolized with two natural gems embedded on the front and surrounded by a decoration which may be the representation of flower petals. 
The sides are engraved with leaf patterns.  The dimensions are 19 mm in diameter and 10 mm wide at bezel with a weight of 5.71 grams.  The land where the ring was discovered is now a Christian retreat and conference center and the finder was privileged to receive permission to search the area.



In historical days, the land was initially owned by wealthy Augustinian Priory since the 12th century.  Thomas Cromwell was surveying for land to settle on and found the location with its stunning surroundings impressive. He took…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

The ring features a custom engraving reading "prepared bee to follow me"

Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on muddy, plowed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serve as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600s to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660s.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in whose honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may refer to death itself.
The examiner at the Department of Archaeology and Numismatics at the National Museum in Cardiff, Mr. Mark Redknapp said that rings like these are often difficult to date, but the decoration and expression of the engraved message suggests a date around 17th century (300 years old). The jewelry item has been declared a treasure and Swansea Museum is interested in acquiring it.
Similar examples of mourning rings found in the U.K featured engraved messages like "Wee part to meete" and all dated back to the 17th century.

 
                       

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