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Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark

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Gilded bronze and silver-plated mounts from a horse bridle have been discovered in the town of Hørning near Skanderborg in Jutland, Denmark along with the remains of a Viking to whom these artifacts belonged to.
The find consists of two cross-shaped fittings and a rectangular buckle.  They are now on display at the Museum of Skaderborg.


Merethe Schifter Bagge, a project manager and archaeologist at the museum said the artifacts are exquisite and so rare that it is considered among some of the greatest archaeological discoveries in Danish history. It dates back to 950 AD which could mean the Viking who owned them could have been a confidant of the king and it is believed to be a gift of alliance from the king. This type of bridle was only available to the most powerful people in the Viking Age

The Museum of Skanderborg archaeologists has secured funding for a full excavation of the area including a huge grave complex, which is unusually large for the time period.

Archaeologists hope to gai…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

The ring features a custom engraving reading "prepared bee to follow me"

Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on muddy, plowed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serve as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600s to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660s.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in whose honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may refer to death itself.
The examiner at the Department of Archaeology and Numismatics at the National Museum in Cardiff, Mr. Mark Redknapp said that rings like these are often difficult to date, but the decoration and expression of the engraved message suggests a date around 17th century (300 years old). The jewelry item has been declared a treasure and Swansea Museum is interested in acquiring it.
Similar examples of mourning rings found in the U.K featured engraved messages like "Wee part to meete" and all dated back to the 17th century.

 
                       

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