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Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

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Adam Day is a 30-year-old lorry driver from Yorkshire.  He recently started a metal detecting hobby and is considered to be an amateur treasure hunter.  Never did he consider his newfound hobby would bring him fame and fortune so soon.
During a search on a farmer's ploughed field near Beverley Minster in Yorkshire he came upon an amazing discovery, a 15th-century bishop's ring made of 20-carat gold.  He recalls the moment when first looking at the ring he just pulled out of the ground and realized it was of significant value and says that he was shaking at the thought of what special piece of jewelry was right there in his hands.

The gold ring is skillfully crafted and engraved with St George and St.Catherine as well as several decorative floral emblems. Since Beverley Minster is close to the location where the artefact was discovered, it is believed that it belonged in the distant past to a bishop from the local church. It has been dated  to between 1450-1550.' The medi…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

The brooch has wing-like features with patterns that represent a dolphin or fish.

A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen is the curator responsible for examining Viking finds.

The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like these were originally attached to a horse harness or religious items like books, a Bishop's staff or altar ornaments. The men who made it back alive after raids in Ireland or British Aisles gifted stolen objects to waiting female family members. The women turned the fittings into jewelry, and attached it to traditional Norse clothing as dress or belt decorations.

The jewelry was discovered on Agdenes farm, at the south end of Trondheim Fjord

The item was not discovered in the original grave, which indicates the grave was disturbed at some point which could have happened during ploughing or other farming activities.
 It is currently curated and preserved at the NTNU University Museum.


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