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Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

The brooch has wing-like features with patterns that represent a dolphin or fish.

A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen is the curator responsible for examining Viking finds.

The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like these were originally attached to a horse harness or religious items like books, a Bishop's staff or altar ornaments. The men who made it back alive after raids in Ireland or British Aisles gifted stolen objects to waiting female family members. The women turned the fittings into jewelry, and attached it to traditional Norse clothing as dress or belt decorations.

The jewelry was discovered on Agdenes farm, at the south end of Trondheim Fjord

The item was not discovered in the original grave, which indicates the grave was disturbed at some point which could have happened during ploughing or other farming activities.
 It is currently curated and preserved at the NTNU University Museum.


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