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Britain's largest gold nugget

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Vincent Thurkettle from Somerset, South West England is a dedicated treasure hunter and gold prospector who now holds the record of finding the largest gold nugget in the U.K, weighing 97.12 grams (3 oz).
The find was made in 2012 near the shipwreck of the Royal Charter, off the coast of Anglesey,  Northwest Wales, but kept a secret until recently to allow him to search the area thoroughly, undisturbed.
At age 16 Vincent left school and trained as a Chartered Forester, following his studies worked for the Forestry Commission.  He had a keen interest in treasure hunting, also wanted to write a book and in 2005, after filling the position of Deputy Director, decided to retire from his job to pursue his dreams, which he both full filled by making several very valuable finds and writing a book named The Wood Fire Handbook.
He describes his passion for treasure hunting: “Every little speck  of gold I’ve found around the world has been a thrill – the campfires I’ve sat around, the people I…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

The brooch has wing-like features with patterns that represent a dolphin or fish.

A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen is the curator responsible for examining Viking finds.

The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like these were originally attached to a horse harness or religious items like books, a Bishop's staff or altar ornaments. The men who made it back alive after raids in Ireland or British Aisles gifted stolen objects to waiting female family members. The women turned the fittings into jewelry, and attached it to traditional Norse clothing as dress or belt decorations.

The jewelry was discovered on Agdenes farm, at the south end of Trondheim Fjord

The item was not discovered in the original grave, which indicates the grave was disturbed at some point which could have happened during ploughing or other farming activities.
 It is currently curated and preserved at the NTNU University Museum.


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