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Valentinian III gold coin and two gold rings found in Sweden

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A gold coin and two rings were found buried at Ă–land, an island and province of Sweden. It is considered a significant find, as it provides more insight on the history of the area, specifically a massacre which took place there in the 5th century.
Archaeologists Sophie Vallulv and Clara Alfsdotter said that it also confirms a theory that the island was acquainted with the Roman Empire.
The coin was minted in honour of Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III, who ruled between 425 and 455.
On one side of the coin is an image of the emperor resting his foot on the head of a barbarian. The other side contains an image of the head of the emperor.
The gold rings are mysterious, as they belonged to a woman, but all of the bodies uncovered in the area where that of men.
Helena Victor, the archaeology project leader said that the property where it was found may have belonged to a headman or minor king.
A large number of skeletons have been discovered all over the area, the bodies were not buri…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

The brooch has wing-like features with patterns that represent a dolphin or fish.

A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen is the curator responsible for examining Viking finds.

The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like these were originally attached to a horse harness or religious items like books, a Bishop's staff or altar ornaments. The men who made it back alive after raids in Ireland or British Aisles gifted stolen objects to waiting female family members. The women turned the fittings into jewelry, and attached it to traditional Norse clothing as dress or belt decorations.

The jewelry was discovered on Agdenes farm, at the south end of Trondheim Fjord

The item was not discovered in the original grave, which indicates the grave was disturbed at some point which could have happened during ploughing or other farming activities.
 It is currently curated and preserved at the NTNU University Museum.


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