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Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark

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Gilded bronze and silver-plated mounts from a horse bridle have been discovered in the town of Hørning near Skanderborg in Jutland, Denmark along with the remains of a Viking to whom these artifacts belonged to.
The find consists of two cross-shaped fittings and a rectangular buckle.  They are now on display at the Museum of Skaderborg.


Merethe Schifter Bagge, a project manager and archaeologist at the museum said the artifacts are exquisite and so rare that it is considered among some of the greatest archaeological discoveries in Danish history. It dates back to 950 AD which could mean the Viking who owned them could have been a confidant of the king and it is believed to be a gift of alliance from the king. This type of bridle was only available to the most powerful people in the Viking Age

The Museum of Skanderborg archaeologists has secured funding for a full excavation of the area including a huge grave complex, which is unusually large for the time period.

Archaeologists hope to gai…

109 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

The fruit cake is described as extremely well preserved, looks and smells edible.

A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition, it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.

Robert Falcon Scott and his companions pictured in 1912

Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. 
Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extremely cold climate have assisted in preventing it to spoil.


A delicious fruitcake

It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake along, as it has a high-calorie value which helps to keep energy levels up. The area is known for extremely low temperatures. The lowest temperature recorded is −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F). The annual temperature of the interior is −57 °C (−70.6 °F). In this climate at least 5,000 calories a day is required and even more if you engage in strenuous activity like pulling sleds across the snow.

The cake was found in its original metal tin packaging which corroded with age.

On their journey back to England, Robert Falcon Scott and his entire party perished on 29 March 1912 (aged 43), 150 miles from their base camp and only 11 miles from the next depot as a result of his written instructions not being followed for a planned meeting with supporting dog teams from the base camp.
The search party who discovered Scott and his companions also found plant fossils they collected which prove Antarctica was forested in the past and joined to other continents. The fruit cake along with other items was left behind, as there were future plans to return to the location.   
                
 
                       

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