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Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

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Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewellery.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with Hodsdon when he noticed he was still on the same spot for more than an hour, pulling handfuls of coins, which is very unusual.
The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.


He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search it was found that days prior, Peter …

106 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

The fruit cake is described as extremely well preserved, looks and smells edible.

A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.

Robert Falcon Scott and his companions pictured in 1912

Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extreme cold climate has assisted in preventing it to spoil.
It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake along, as it has a high calorie value which helps to keep energy levels up. The area is known for extreme low temperatures. The lowest temperature recorded is −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F). The annual temperature of the interior is −57 °C (−70.6 °F). In this climate at least 5,000 calories a day is required and even more if you engage in strenuous activity like pulling sleds across the snow.

The cake was found in its original metal tin packaging which corroded with age.

On their journey back to England, Robert Falcon Scott and his entire party perished on 29 March 1912 (aged 43), 150 miles from their base camp and only 11 miles from the next depot as a result of his written instructions not being followed for a planned meeting with supporting dog teams from the base camp. The search party who discovered Scott and his companions also found plant fossils they collected which proves Antarctica was forested in the past and joined to other continents. The fruit cake along with other items were left behind, as there were future plans to return to the location.

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