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Showing posts from October, 2017

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Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

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Adam Day is a 30-year-old lorry driver from Yorkshire.  He recently started a metal detecting hobby and is considered to be an amateur treasure hunter.  Never did he consider his newfound hobby would bring him fame and fortune so soon.
During a search on a farmer's ploughed field near Beverley Minster in Yorkshire he came upon an amazing discovery, a 15th-century bishop's ring made of 20-carat gold.  He recalls the moment when first looking at the ring he just pulled out of the ground and realized it was of significant value and says that he was shaking at the thought of what special piece of jewelry was right there in his hands.

The gold ring is skillfully crafted and engraved with St George and St.Catherine as well as several decorative floral emblems. Since Beverley Minster is close to the location where the artefact was discovered, it is believed that it belonged in the distant past to a bishop from the local church. It has been dated  to between 1450-1550.' The medi…

106 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

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A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.


Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extreme cold climate has assisted in preventing it to spoil.
It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake alo…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

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Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on a muddy, ploughed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serves as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600's to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660's.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in who's honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may r…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

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A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.


The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like thes…

Hoard of silver Arabic coins found in East Ukraine.

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Numerous silver coins which dates back to the Samanid Empire (819-999 AD) and other artefacts were discovered by a metal detectorist in North-East Ukraine at a site by the Psel river in Sumy Oblast.

Silver fittings, which are remains of a belt were also found with the coins and it is believed that the coins were kept in a bag or some kind of purse, attached to the belt.  The coins are silver dirhams which were minted in the Samanid Empire, a Sunni Iranian empire, surrounding Afghanistan, and parts of Iran, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and between 819-999 AD.