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Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark

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Gilded bronze and silver-plated mounts from a horse bridle have been discovered in the town of Hørning near Skanderborg in Jutland, Denmark along with the remains of a Viking to whom these artifacts belonged to.
The find consists of two cross-shaped fittings and a rectangular buckle.  They are now on display at the Museum of Skaderborg.


Merethe Schifter Bagge, a project manager and archaeologist at the museum said the artifacts are exquisite and so rare that it is considered among some of the greatest archaeological discoveries in Danish history. It dates back to 950 AD which could mean the Viking who owned them could have been a confidant of the king and it is believed to be a gift of alliance from the king. This type of bridle was only available to the most powerful people in the Viking Age

The Museum of Skanderborg archaeologists has secured funding for a full excavation of the area including a huge grave complex, which is unusually large for the time period.

Archaeologists hope to gai…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

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Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on muddy, plowed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serve as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600s to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660s.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in whose honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may refer to death itself.
The…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

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A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which was stolen during raids.


The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like these were…

Hoard of silver Arabic coins found in East Ukraine.

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Numerous silver coins which dates back to the Samanid Empire (819-999 AD) and other artifacts were discovered by a metal detectorist in North-East Ukraine at a site by the Psel river in Sumy Oblast.

Silver fittings, which are remains of a belt were also found with the coins and it is believed that the coins were kept in a bag or some kind of purse, attached to the belt.  The coins are silver dirhams which were minted in the Samanid Empire, a Sunni Iranian empire, surrounding Afghanistan, and parts of Iran, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and between 819-999 AD.