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Gold coil shaped bracelets found in County Donegal, Ireland

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Norman Witherow is a farmer in County Donegal, Ireland.  He made an astonishing discovery of four coil-shaped solid gold bracelets and they are believed to date back to the Bronze Age (2500-500 BC) or even older according to National Museum of Ireland.
The items were buried two feet deep, hidden under a rock, which protected them and was covered with clay.
Their likely use was that of jewelry, but could also have been some form of currency.  Research is currently in progress to uncover more information about them and so far there are no items exactly the same as these found.
It is expected that this golden treasure will be on display at the National Museum of Ireland soon.

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Boy finds World War II plane and pilot in Denmark.

14 year old Daniel Rom Kristiansen from Birkelse, Denmark, put his metal detector to work a made a remarkable discovery after his father shared a memory of a story his grandfather told him about his family making Christmas cookies in December 1944 when a World War II plane which crashed on their farmland.

Daniel's father, an agricultural worker, having never in 40 years, neither his relatives who have worked on the land for decades seen any
evidence to suspect the plane was still on the property, believed the wreckage had been removed years before, but Daniel decided he wanted to search the field any way. A signal sounded and they uncovered some metal fragments, but realized they will need to dig much deeper and borrowed an excavator  from a neighbor.  A few meters down there were thousands of metal pieces, which initially did not represent a plane, more digging revealed the motor of an engine from a Bf 109 Messerschmitt plane, Luftwaffe munitions, then the skeleton of the pilot with parts of his clothes, a wallet with money and a small Bible.
Following their report to the authorities about the find, the North Jutland Police closed the crash site for investigation and a bomb disposal team was dispatched, as there were ammunition found as well. The plane parts and pilot's possessions are at the Historical Museum of Northen Jutland.

Mr.Torben Sarauw, curator at the museum, believes the pilot came from a city nearby named Aalborg where there was a training base for German pilots, as there were some food stamps found for the canteen of that base. Forensic experts are working to recover the remains of the deceased pilot.  Following definite identification, his relatives will be notified and he will likely be buried in Germany. 













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