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Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

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A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



Two rare Viking coins found in Northern Ireland

Mr. Brian Morton with a representative of the British Museum.

Mr. Brian Morton, a full-time carer from Moneymore, was treasure hunting on a farmland in Newcastle, County Down when he discovered two rare Viking coins. These coins are a rare type of Hiberno-Manx, mainly circulated in the Isle of Man during the eleventh century and made of 93% silver.
It is the first of their kind to be found in Northen Ireland. Experts believe they may have been dispossessed during a Viking raid on a monastery at Maghera.

Vikings commenced their attacks on Ireland around 800 AD, where they stayed until 1169, up to the time of the Norman invasion. Taking into consideration that the coins were found at a location with no significant landmark or indicator and 5 feet (1.5m) apart, it is suggested by a former coin curator at the Ulster Museum that they were dropped and not deliberately buried. The Belfast authorities officially declared the coins as a treasure and they have been sent to the British Museum for valuation. National Museums Northern Ireland and Ulster Museum will both try to obtain these artifacts.

 
                       

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