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Trove of Bronze Age jewellery discovered in Poland

Mariusz Sikora was out metal detecting in Lubnowy Wielkie, Poland when his detector signal indicated a deep non ferrous target. On the spot he found a trove of bronze jewellery which dates back to the Bronze Age.
Historical experts from the Galea association confirmed that these items are linked to the Lusatian culture.  Likely it was burial gifts. Bones were not found, as cremenation was custom in their culture, human bones would usually indicate possible human sacrifice.
Numerous caches containing metal work of both bronze and gold have been found throughout areas in Poland, grave sites containing tools and weapons are sometimes seen.
They also said that it is a great discovery. The site could have been easily overlooked, as it is fairly remote and cemeteries of this culture are most often quite large and there were no other graves in close proximity.
There were several pottery fragments too, but it is unclear if the pot was a single piece or if it contained something.

Two rare Viking coins found in Northern Ireland

Mr. Brian Morton with a representative of the British Museum.

Mr. Brian Morton, a full-time carer from Moneymore, was treasure hunting on a farmland in Newcastle, County Down when he discovered two rare Viking coins. These coins are a rare type of Hiberno-Manx, mainly circulated in the Isle of Man during the eleventh century and made of 93% silver.
It is the first of their kind to be found in Northen Ireland. Experts believe they may have been dispossessed during a Viking raid on a monastery at Maghera.

Vikings commenced their attacks on Ireland around 800 AD, where they stayed until 1169, up to the time of the Norman invasion. Taking in to consideration that the coins were found at a location with no significant landmark or indicator and 5 feet (1.5m) apart, it is suggested by a former coin curator at the Ulster Museum that they were dropped and not deliberately buried. The Belfast authorities officially declared the coins as a treasure and they have been sent to the British Museum for valuation. National Museums Northern Ireland and Ulster Museum will both try to obtain these artifacts.


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