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Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

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A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



Oldest Iron Age gold jewellery found in Britain - Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs.


Mark Hambleton and Joe Kania uncovered three gold necklaces and one bracelet in Staffordshire. The collection has been named the Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs and believed to be around 2500 years old.  It features some earliest Celtic art ever discovered.

The items were found close together, the reason why they were buried is not known, possibilities are an act of remembrance after their owner died, for safekeeping or an offering to the gods.



Dr. Julia Farley, curator of British & European Iron Age collections for the British Museum says that the torcs were probably worn by wealthy and powerful women.
Piecing together how these objects came to be carefully buried in the Staffordshire field will provide invaluable insight into life in Iron Age Britain.              
                     
 
                       

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