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Trove of Bronze Age jewellery discovered in Poland

Mariusz Sikora was out metal detecting in Lubnowy Wielkie, Poland when his detector signal indicated a deep non ferrous target. On the spot he found a trove of bronze jewellery which dates back to the Bronze Age.
Historical experts from the Galea association confirmed that these items are linked to the Lusatian culture.  Likely it was burial gifts. Bones were not found, as cremenation was custom in their culture, human bones would usually indicate possible human sacrifice.
Numerous caches containing metal work of both bronze and gold have been found throughout areas in Poland, grave sites containing tools and weapons are sometimes seen.
They also said that it is a great discovery. The site could have been easily overlooked, as it is fairly remote and cemeteries of this culture are most often quite large and there were no other graves in close proximity.
There were several pottery fragments too, but it is unclear if the pot was a single piece or if it contained something.

Oldest Iron Age gold jewellery found in Britain - Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs.

Mark Hambleton and Joe Kania uncovered three gold necklaces and one bracelet in Staffordshire. The collection has been named the Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs and believed to be around 2500 years old.  It features some earliest Celtic art ever discovered.

The items were found close together, the reason why they were buried is not known, possibilities are an act of remembrance after their owner died, for safekeeping or and offering to the gods.

Dr. Julia Farley, curator of British & European Iron Age collections for the British Museum says that the torcs were probably worn by wealthy and powerful women.
Piecing together how these objects came to be carefully buried in the Staffordshire field will provide invaluable insight into life in Iron Age Britain.                                                                                      


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