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Britain's largest gold nugget

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Vincent Thurkettle from Somerset, South West England is a dedicated treasure hunter and gold prospector who now holds the record of finding the largest gold nugget in the U.K, weighing 97.12 grams (3 oz).
The find was made in 2012 near the shipwreck of the Royal Charter, off the coast of Anglesey,  Northwest Wales, but kept a secret until recently to allow him to search the area thoroughly, undisturbed.
At age 16 Vincent left school and trained as a Chartered Forester, following his studies worked for the Forestry Commission.  He had a keen interest in treasure hunting, also wanted to write a book and in 2005, after filling the position of Deputy Director, decided to retire from his job to pursue his dreams, which he both full filled by making several very valuable finds and writing a book named The Wood Fire Handbook.
He describes his passion for treasure hunting: “Every little speck  of gold I’ve found around the world has been a thrill – the campfires I’ve sat around, the people I…

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

Dan Mackay with some of the identity tags he found

37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags were buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings.
The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.  
Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.

Ken Oakhill in 1945 who's millitary identity 
tag was among those discovered.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong shaped disc and was attached to a long cord, worn around the neck.
The second tag was a shade of red color, circular shaped disc and was threaded on a 6 inch cord and suspended from the first tag.
The purpose of these tags were to identify the body of  a soldier upon death. The information contained on it was the soldier's name, number, rank, unit and religion. 
The first tag was intended to remain on the body and the second taken to record the death.

It appears from the discovery that the British Army may have considered introducing the new stainless steel tags into circulation much earlier, but abandoned the idea later during conflict.

Following the discovery Mr. MacKay was keen to reunite the discs with the relatives of those to whom they belonged, even wiling to travel nationwide.  There were names of military metal winners, prisoners of war, people who were written about in military journals and many more.  
He initially contacted the British Legion and several military historians and magazines but his request for assistance was turned down. But he was not willing to give up and finally made a breakthrough on the website Forces War Records.  They connected him with the son of a surviving veteran named Frederick Henry Bills.
There are still many tags which have not be reunited with relatives and the search continues.



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