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Metal detecting duo discovers hoard of 2000 coins in Cornwall

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They called in some help and spent all day carefully unearthing the remarkable find and said it is an unforgettable event and it took them a couple of days to fully realize the significance of their find.  He believes there is a lot more out there to be found and eager to embark on the next metal detecting adventure.
Mr. Neil says that they gave the coins to the Royal Cornwall Museum which forwarded them to the British Museum for evaluation and has been officially classed as a treasure. 


The coins were an official currency and in circulation around the late Roman era.The Royal Cornwall Museum intends on purchasing the hoard following evaluation by the British Museum. Mr Troon and Neil will share the selling price with the landowner.  



Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

Dan Mackay with some of the identity tags he found

37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags were buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings.
The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.  
Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.

Ken Oakhill in 1945 who's millitary identity 
tag was among those discovered.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong shaped disc and was attached to a long cord, worn around the neck.
The second tag was a shade of red color, circular shaped disc and was threaded on a 6 inch cord and suspended from the first tag.
The purpose of these tags were to identify the body of  a soldier upon death. The information contained on it was the soldier's name, number, rank, unit and religion. 
The first tag was intended to remain on the body and the second taken to record the death.

It appears from the discovery that the British Army may have considered introducing the new stainless steel tags into circulation much earlier, but abandoned the idea later during conflict.

Following the discovery Mr. MacKay was keen to reunite the discs with the relatives of those to whom they belonged, even wiling to travel nationwide.  There were names of military metal winners, prisoners of war, people who were written about in military journals and many more.  
He initially contacted the British Legion and several military historians and magazines but his request for assistance was turned down. But he was not willing to give up and finally made a breakthrough on the website Forces War Records.  They connected him with the son of a surviving veteran named Frederick Henry Bills.
There are still many tags which have not be reunited with relatives and the search continues.



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