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Gold coil shaped bracelets found in County Donegal, Ireland

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Norman Witherow is a farmer in County Donegal, Ireland.  He made an astonishing discovery of four coil-shaped solid gold bracelets and they are believed to date back to the Bronze Age (2500-500 BC) or even older according to National Museum of Ireland.
The items were buried two feet deep, hidden under a rock, which protected them and was covered with clay.
Their likely use was that of jewelry, but could also have been some form of currency.  Research is currently in progress to uncover more information about them and so far there are no items exactly the same as these found.
It is expected that this golden treasure will be on display at the National Museum of Ireland soon.

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Largest solidus coin hoard in the Netherlands uncovered.



Mark Volleberg found 23 Roman gold coins while metal detecting on an orchard in Lienden, a village outside Buren in the central Dutch province of Gelderland. Metal detectorists Dik van Ommeren and Cees-Jan van de Pol also discovered eight gold coins on the same orchard in 2012.
Archival research revealed Roman gold has been found on the same property since 1840.  The land originally belonged to Baron van Brakell. Further finds were made in 1905 and again in 1916.  A total of 42 pieces were unearthed over the years there.
Unfortunately the whereabouts of the earlier found coins are unknown.
All are solidi which was a pure gold coin issued originally by Constantine in the late Roman Empire and then by following emperors and minted over more than 80 years, dating to the late 4th, early 5th century.  A diversity of time periods and emperors is not uncommon for late Roman solidus hoards. These coins were not in regular circulation because they were very valuable and worth years of pay for most workers, therefore, those who owned them collected and hoarded them for years, even generations.
The hoard includes a solidus minted by Emperor Flavius Julius Valerius Majorianus (c. AD 420 – August 7, 461) which was the last known Roman tax coin from the Netherlands and the West. The National Service for Cultural Heritage carried out an excavation on the land.  No more related items or clues as to why they were buried there was found.
During the excavation archaeologists discovered a tomb with bones, but carbon dating revealed it was inhumation burials dating to a time far earlier, approximately 1800 B.C. (Middle Bronze Age).
Archaeologists believes the hoard was buried around 460 A.D.and the Middle Bronze Age tomb was likely on what was then a hill which would have been a recognizable spot on the landscape and easy to find once the depositor was ready to collect it. The hill was likely flattened in the 1840s to create farmland. At that time the coins started turning up.
The coins are now on display at Museum Valkhof in Nijmegen.

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