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Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

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A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



Largest solidus coin hoard in the Netherlands uncovered.

Coins from the hoard

Mark Volleberg found 23 Roman gold coins while metal detecting on an orchard in Lienden, a village outside Buren in the central Dutch province of Gelderland. Metal detectorists Dik van Ommeren and Cees-Jan van de Pol also discovered eight gold coins on the same orchard in 2012.
Archival research revealed Roman gold has been found on the same property since 1840.

The land originally belonged to Baron van Brakell. Further finds were made in 1905 and again in 1916.  A total of 42 pieces were unearthed over the years there. Unfortunately, the whereabouts of the earlier found coins are unknown.
All are solidi which were a pure gold coin issued originally by Constantine in the late Roman Empire and then by following emperors and minted over more than 80 years, dating to the late 4th, early 5th century.  A diversity of time periods and emperors is not uncommon for late Roman solidus hoards. These coins were not in regular circulation because they were very valuable and worth years of pay for most workers, therefore, those who owned them collected and hoarded them for years, even generations.


An apple orchard

The hoard includes a solidus minted by Emperor Flavius Julius Valerius Majorianus (c. AD 420 – August 7, 461) which was the last known Roman tax coin from the Netherlands and the West. The National Service for Cultural Heritage carried out an excavation on the land. No more related items or clues as to why they were buried there was found.
During the excavation, archaeologists discovered a tomb with bones, but carbon dating revealed it was inhumation burials dating to a time far earlier, approximately 1800 B.C. (Middle Bronze Age).
Archaeologists believe the hoard was buried around 460 A.D.and the Middle Bronze Age tomb was likely on what was then a hill which would have been a recognizable spot on the landscape and easy to find once the depositor was ready to collect it. The hill was likely flattened in the 1840s to create farmland. At that time the coins started turning up.
The coins are now on display at Museum Valkhof in Nijmegen.

 
                     

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