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Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

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Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewellery.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with Hodsdon when he noticed he was still on the same spot for more than an hour, pulling handfuls of coins, which is very unusual.
The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.


He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search it was found that days prior, Peter …

Largest hoard of Roman coins - Wold Newton Hoard.


Mr. David Blakey from Hartlepool, United Kingdom, discovered the largest hoard of Roman coins one morning while he was searching on a field in Wold Newton, East Yorkshire.  He almost did not make the discovery, as he was just about to go for lunch and a rest following an unproductive morning, when his metal detector sounded as it was moving over the target.

Named the Wold Newton Hoard, it contains an astonishing 1.857 Roman coins and dates around 307 CE, featuring coins representing Constantius and also the first coins to proclaim his son, Constantine, Augustus following his instatement as emperor of York.

The haul is believed to have been the equivalent of an annual salary for a Roman soldier in that era.  It has been evaluated to be worth £44,200 today.

The curator of numismatics at the Yorkshire Museum, Mr. Andrew Woods, said that the find is absolutely stunning and has an irrefutable connection to one of the most significant periods in the Roman history of York.  This was a crucial time in York's history and that of the western world as there was great uncertainty in the empire, because several Roman powers seek to challenge the claim Constantine had as emperor.
The hoard, as well as the original ceramic vase it was found in, which remained fairly well intact, is currently on display at the Yorkshire Museum.  There are still mysteries surrounding the hoard as to why it was buried and to whom it belonged to.                                                                                                           











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