Latest news

Talisman for warding off evil spirits in Middle Ages found in Norfolk

Image
A  silver gilt cross with size 14mm by 12mm (0.5in by 0.4in) from the 15th Century was recently found by a metal detectorist near Wramplingham in Norfolk.

During the Middle Ages, a feared disease named  St Anthony's Fire, affecting both humans and livestock, which caused dreadful symptoms developed in Europe and soon became
widespread.
It was initially believed to be the cause of bewitchment, therefore supersticious people would wear a talisman in the form of a cross in an attempt to ward off the evil spirits.

Norfolk's finds liaison officer for the county's Historic Environment Service, Julie Shoemark said that the symptoms were, amongst others, mania, convulsions, skin lesions and in
the progressive stage, gangrene.

The name St.Anthony's Fire came about after the disease broke out in France and hospitals were specially erected to treat victims. Gaston de la Valloire a nobleman of the Dauphiné,
was the founder of these hospitals and dedicated them to Saint Anthony (c…

Largest hoard of Roman coins - Wold Newton Hoard.


Mr. David Blakey from Hartlepool, United Kingdom, discovered the largest hoard of Roman coins one morning while he was searching on a field in Wold Newton, East Yorkshire.  He almost did not make the discovery, as he was just about to go for lunch and a rest following an unproductive morning, when his metal detector sounded as it was moving over the target.

Named the Wold Newton Hoard, it contains an astonishing 1.857 Roman coins and dates around 307 CE, featuring coins representing Constantius and also the first coins to proclaim his son, Constantine, Augustus following his instatement as emperor of York.

The haul is believed to have been the equivalent of an annual salary for a Roman soldier in that era.  It has been evaluated to be worth £44,200 today.

The curator of numismatics at the Yorkshire Museum, Mr. Andrew Woods, said that the find is absolutely stunning and has an irrefutable connection to one of the most significant periods in the Roman history of York.  This was a crucial time in York's history and that of the western world as there was great uncertainty in the empire, because several Roman powers seek to challenge the claim Constantine had as emperor.
The hoard, as well as the original ceramic vase it was found in, which remained fairly well intact, is currently on display at the Yorkshire Museum.  There are still mysteries surrounding the hoard as to why it was buried and to whom it belonged to.                                                                                                           











Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Gold and silver coins hoard and medieval ring.

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.