Latest news

Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

Image
Adam Day is a 30-year-old lorry driver from Yorkshire.  He recently started a metal detecting hobby and is considered to be an amateur treasure hunter.  Never did he consider his newfound hobby would bring him fame and fortune so soon.
During a search on a farmer's ploughed field near Beverley Minster in Yorkshire he came upon an amazing discovery, a 15th-century bishop's ring made of 20-carat gold.  He recalls the moment when first looking at the ring he just pulled out of the ground and realized it was of significant value and says that he was shaking at the thought of what special piece of jewelry was right there in his hands.

The gold ring is skillfully crafted and engraved with St George and St.Catherine as well as several decorative floral emblems. Since Beverley Minster is close to the location where the artefact was discovered, it is believed that it belonged in the distant past to a bishop from the local church. It has been dated  to between 1450-1550.' The medi…

Largest hoard of Roman coins - Wold Newton Hoard.


Mr. David Blakey from Hartlepool, United Kingdom, discovered the largest hoard of Roman coins one morning while he was searching on a field in Wold Newton, East Yorkshire.  He almost did not make the discovery, as he was just about to go for lunch and a rest following an unproductive morning, when his metal detector sounded as it was moving over the target.

Named the Wold Newton Hoard, it contains an astonishing 1.857 Roman coins and dates around 307 CE, featuring coins representing Constantius and also the first coins to proclaim his son, Constantine, Augustus following his instatement as emperor of York.

The haul is believed to have been the equivalent of an annual salary for a Roman soldier in that era.  It has been evaluated to be worth £44,200 today.

The curator of numismatics at the Yorkshire Museum, Mr. Andrew Woods, said that the find is absolutely stunning and has an irrefutable connection to one of the most significant periods in the Roman history of York.  This was a crucial time in York's history and that of the western world as there was great uncertainty in the empire, because several Roman powers seek to challenge the claim Constantine had as emperor.
The hoard, as well as the original ceramic vase it was found in, which remained fairly well intact, is currently on display at the Yorkshire Museum.  There are still mysteries surrounding the hoard as to why it was buried and to whom it belonged to.                                                                                                           











Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Gilded horse mounts of Viking confidant of the king found in Denmark

Beginner's luck for 3 Year old boy who unearths Medieval reliquary worth £70 000

Long lost treasure of gold coins discovered on the coast of Namibia