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Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

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A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



Bronze Roman statue ear found near Dere street

A three inches (eight centimeters) long ear from a life-size bronze Roman statue has been unearthed by a metal detectorist in the village of Brompton-on-Swale, close to a Roman fort and settlement Cataractonium, today is known as Catterick, North Yorkshire and was confirmed to date back to 200AD (1800 years old). Experts believe it broke off during transport and was never recovered to be refitted. It is one of the oldest relics of its kind ever found in Britain, incredibly rare, very detailed and of high-level craftsmanship.  


The find was made near Dere street, which is a road built by the ancient Romans, the A1 runs alongside it today.
The Roman relic was documented with a recorder of archaeological objects found by members of the public named the Portable Antiquities Scheme.
 It was sold for £1100 on auction.

 

                    

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