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Valentinian III gold coin and two gold rings found in Sweden

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A gold coin and two rings were found buried at Öland, an island and province of Sweden. It is considered a significant find, as it provides more insight on the history of the area, specifically a massacre which took place there in the 5th century.
Archaeologists Sophie Vallulv and Clara Alfsdotter said that it also confirms a theory that the island was acquainted with the Roman Empire.
The coin was minted in honour of Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III, who ruled between 425 and 455.
On one side of the coin is an image of the emperor resting his foot on the head of a barbarian. The other side contains an image of the head of the emperor.
The gold rings are mysterious, as they belonged to a woman, but all of the bodies uncovered in the area where that of men.
Helena Victor, the archaeology project leader said that the property where it was found may have belonged to a headman or minor king.
A large number of skeletons have been discovered all over the area, the bodies were not buri…

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered


Lee Sansom, an HGV driver from Saltney, Chesire made the discovery of a lifetime while metal detecting with his father in a group of 20 metal detectorists on a field in Farndon. At first he thought it was just a piece of junk, but as he cleared more of the mud from the find he soon realized it was of ancient origin and far more significant value.

British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewellery was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valuation by the British Museum.  Half of the money will be paid to mr. Sansom and the other half to the landowner of the field where it was found.


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