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Showing posts from September, 2017

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Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition

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A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition.
Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectus who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago.

The finder said 'At first I was quite skeptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realized what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.'

The coin is approximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams.  Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo.

The only other known specimen of this coin in in the wo…

Hoard of Roman coins unearthed under an old tree.

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A hoard of over 200 Roman silver and bronze coins was unearthed in the central part of Mezdra, Bulgaria. The hoard was found under the roots of an old plum tree, during the clearing of a property belonging to sisters Neli and Petq Krustevi.
While removing the tree, the top of an old ceramic pot became visible. One of the workers attempted to remove the pot from the ground, but it broke because of it's fragile material and the ancient coins spilled out. The property owners have collected the coins with all pieces of the ceramic pot and reported it to the local museum.
Experts concluded that the coins are Roman Denarius and Antoninianus with various denomination and predominantly of silver content. Most dates from 1st century AD.



Exceptionally rare Early Medieval crucifix discovered.

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Mr. Tom Redmayne from Lincolnshire discovered a very rare ancient crucifix while metal detecting on a field in Skidbrooke.
The item has been evaluated to date from the Early Medieval age (AD950-1150).
Cast in lead alloy, it is described as 26.36mm in height, 18.7mm in width, with a weight of 4.01 grams. A dent on the top suggests it had a suspension loop.
The crucifix displays Christ on the cross with three emphasized dots on the torso, which experts believe may represent the Holy Trinity.
According to archaeologist Adam Daubney, from Lincolnshire County Council, only one other near identical, almost-complete piece was found on August 2015 in Swinhope.
Mr. Daubney also said the crucifix was likely designed in England from a Scandinavian prototype, but made overseas and tells us something about cross-channel trade and religion during that era.

Mr. Redmayne said when he found the item, he guessed it was possibly ancient, due to its unrefined design, but did not initially realize the discovery…

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

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37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags was buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings. The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.   Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong-shaped disc a…

18 Ounce gold nugget worth more than $70000 found

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Oscar Espinoza, of Modesto, California was out with his metal detector in a woods creek in Jamestown when he struck gold.  He uncovered an 18-ounce nugget. The estimated value is $70,000.  The find has been placed somewhere away from his residence for safekeeping until it will be sold.
Bryant Shock, a local business owner, said it was a rare find and he believes it will spark collectors' interest, resulting in driving the price up four or five times.
The nugget is more valuable in its original form because it's a piece of history and if it is melted down, only the metal will make up its value.

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered

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British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back, it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewelry was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valuation by the British Museum.  Half of the money will be paid to Mr. Sansom and the other half to the landowner of the field where it was found.

Two rare Viking coins found in Northern Ireland

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Mr. Brian Morton, a full-time carer from Moneymore, was treasure hunting on a farmland in Newcastle, County Down when he discovered two rare Viking coins. These coins are a rare type of Hiberno-Manx, mainly circulated in the Isle of Man during the eleventh century and made of 93% silver.
It is the first of their kind to be found in Northen Ireland. Experts believe they may have been dispossessed during a Viking raid on a monastery at Maghera.

Vikings commenced their attacks on Ireland around 800 AD, where they stayed until 1169, up to the time of the Norman invasion. Taking into consideration that the coins were found at a location with no significant landmark or indicator and 5 feet (1.5m) apart, it is suggested by a former coin curator at the Ulster Museum that they were dropped and not deliberately buried. The Belfast authorities officially declared the coins as a treasure and they have been sent to the British Museum for valuation. National Museums Northern Ireland and Ulster Museum…

Hidden trunk of World War 2 soldier found

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A trunk, containing the perfectly preserved possessions of a Nazi German soldier who fought on the Eastern Front sometime between 1941 and 1945, has been unearthed in Nevsky Pyatachok, Russia.
Among some of the possessions found in the trunk are alcohol, cigars, uniform, shoes and a wallet with German currency.
Historians will be working on determining who the owner is and tracking down their relatives. This can be a difficult and time-consuming task.
Nazi Germany declared war on Russia and began it’s an invasion, breaking a non-aggression pact.
This war on the Eastern Front lasted until 1945.



Bronze Roman statue ear found near Dere street

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A three inches (eight centimeters) long ear from a life-size bronze Roman statue has been unearthed by a metal detectorist in the village of Brompton-on-Swale, close to a Roman fort and settlement Cataractonium, today is known as Catterick, North Yorkshire and was confirmed to date back to 200AD (1800 years old). Experts believe it broke off during transport and was never recovered to be refitted. It is one of the oldest relics of its kind ever found in Britain, incredibly rare, very detailed and of high-level craftsmanship.


The find was made near Dere street, which is a road built by the ancient Romans, the A1 runs alongside it today.
The Roman relic was documented with a recorder of archaeological objects found by members of the public named the Portable Antiquities Scheme.
 It was sold for £1100 on auction.


Medieval knight's longsword found in Poland

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Mr.Wojciech Kot from Mircze, Poland found an intact late medieval longsword in a peat bog. The find has been handed over to Stanislw Staszic Museum in Hrubieszów. The exact location of where it was found is kept secret.
The sword has a cruciform handle and missing its original hilt, which would have been made out of either, antler, wood or bone.
It is corroded due to the time spent buried in a wetland, but intact from pommel to tip. Its excellent condition reveals that there are no signs of it deliberately discarded.


Mr. Bartłomiej Bartecki, director of Stanisław Staszic Museum in Hrubieszów said that it is possible that the knight was pulled into the mash or lost his sword in the peat bog. These items in original form had a surprisingly low weight of just 1.5 kilos (3.3 lbs) despite its size of 120 centimeters (4 feet) long.  The sword was an agile weapon for knights in battle during the 14th century with its lightweight, long reach and elongated grip for two-handed use.  A unique mark …

Jawbone with golden teeth found near Edward's Crossing

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Mr. Isaac Jones from Nevada City discovered half a jaw bone with three intact golden teeth while metal detecting near Edwards Crossing, a historic bridge which gold prospectors mining for gold in the area used to cross the Yuba River.



The remains have been turned over to Nevada County Sheriff. Captain Paul Schmitt said that they will be sending it to a forensic anthropologist. It can take up to 6 months for scientists to determine the age and if there is DNA or dental records.
It is possible that this could be the remains of an old miner or a missing person and may possibly bring closure to a grieving family.

Largest solidus coin hoard in the Netherlands uncovered.

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Mark Volleberg found 23 Roman gold coins while metal detecting on an orchard in Lienden, a village outside Buren in the central Dutch province of Gelderland. Metal detectorists Dik van Ommeren and Cees-Jan van de Pol also discovered eight gold coins on the same orchard in 2012.
Archival research revealed Roman gold has been found on the same property since 1840.

The land originally belonged to Baron van Brakell. Further finds were made in 1905 and again in 1916.  A total of 42 pieces were unearthed over the years there. Unfortunately, the whereabouts of the earlier found coins are unknown.
All are solidi which were a pure gold coin issued originally by Constantine in the late Roman Empire and then by following emperors and minted over more than 80 years, dating to the late 4th, early 5th century.  A diversity of time periods and emperors is not uncommon for late Roman solidus hoards. These coins were not in regular circulation because they were very valuable and worth years of pay for mo…