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Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

New discovery from the Benešov Superbolide found 20 years later

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Meteorite fragments from a famous Superbolide named Benešov, which occured more than 20 years ago in the skies of the Czech Republic, has been discovered. These spectacular events are relatively rare and due to the force of the impact causing displacement during the collusion and other natural causes like wind speed at the time the fragments enter the atmosphere, makes it difficult to pin point the exact location where they have fallen on Earth.The Benešov Superbolide was recorded by the European Fireball Network during systematic photographic observations and certainly produced multiple meteorite fall with thousands of fragments, but despite many attempts, none were found even years after the fall.The recent discovery was made possible when mr. Pavel Spurný of the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and his colleagues used improved methods to analyze the records of the data of the event. With revised trajectory they pin pointed a new impact locat…

Valentinian III gold coin and two gold rings found in Sweden

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A gold coin and two rings were found buried at Öland, an island and province of Sweden. It is considered a significant find, as it provides more insight on the history of the area, specifically a massacre which took place there in the 5th century.
Archaeologists Sophie Vallulv and Clara Alfsdotter said that it also confirms a theory that the island was acquainted with the Roman Empire.
The coin was minted in honour of Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III, who ruled between 425 and 455.
On one side of the coin is an image of the emperor resting his foot on the head of a barbarian. The other side contains an image of the head of the emperor.
The gold rings are mysterious, as they belonged to a woman, but all of the bodies uncovered in the area where that of men.
Helena Victor, the archaeology project leader said that the property where it was found may have belonged to a headman or minor king.
A large number of skeletons have been discovered all over the area, the bodies were not buri…

Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

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Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewellery.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with Hodsdon when he noticed he was still on the same spot for more than an hour, pulling handfuls of coins, which is very unusual.
The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.


He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search it was found that days prior, Peter …

Hoard of 1000 coins dating back to English Civil War found

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A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a ploughed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace.
The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell.
This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war.
A few smaller scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington.
Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as m…

106 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

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A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.


Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extreme cold climate has assisted in preventing it to spoil.
It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake alo…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

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Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on a muddy, ploughed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serves as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600's to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660's.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in who's honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may r…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

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A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.


The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like thes…

Hoard of silver Arabic coins found in East Ukraine.

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Numerous silver coins which dates back to the Samanid Empire (819-999 AD) and other artefacts were discovered by a metal detectorist in North-East Ukraine at a site by the Psel river in Sumy Oblast.

Silver fittings, which are remains of a belt were also found with the coins and it is believed that the coins were kept in a bag or some kind of purse, attached to the belt.  The coins are silver dirhams which were minted in the Samanid Empire, a Sunni Iranian empire, surrounding Afghanistan, and parts of Iran, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and between 819-999 AD.


Hoard of Roman coins unearthed under an old tree.

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A hoard of over 200 Roman silver and bronze coins was unearthed in the central part of Mezdra, Bulgaria. The hoard was found under the roots of an old plum tree, during clearing of a property belonging to sisters Neli and Petq Krustevi.
While removing the tree, the top of an old ceramic pot became visible. One of the workers attempted to remove the pot from the ground, but it broke because of it's fragile material and the ancient coins spilled out. The property owners have collected the coins with all pieces of the ceramic pot and reported it to the local museum.
Experts concluded that the coins are Roman Denarius and Antoninianus with various denomination and predominantly of silver content. Most dates from 1st century AD.



Exceptionally rare Early Medieval crucifix discovered.

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Mr. Tom Redmayne from Lincolnshire discovered a very rare ancient crucifix while metal detecting on a field in Skidbrooke.
The item has been evaluated to date from the Early Medieval age (AD950-1150).
Cast in lead alloy, it is described as 26.36mm in height, 18.7mm in width, with a weight of 4.01 grams. A dent on the top suggests it had a suspension loop.
The crucifix displays Christ on the cross with three emphasized dots on the torso, which experts believe may represent the Holy Trinity.
According to archaeologist Adam Daubney, from Lincolnshire County Council, only one other near identical, almost-complete piece was found on August 2015 in Swinhope.
Mr. Daubney also said the crucifix was likely designed in England from a Scandinavian prototype, but made overseas and tells us something about cross-channel trade and religion during that era.

Mr. Redmayne said when he found the item, he guessed it was possibly ancient, due to it's unrefined design, but did not initially realize t…

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

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37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags were buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings. The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.   Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong shaped …

18 Ounce gold nugget worth more than $70000 found

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Oscar Espinoza, of Modesto, California was out with his metal detector in a woods creek in Jamestown when he struck gold.  He uncovered an 18 ounce nugget. The estimated value is $70,000.  The find has been placed somewhere away from his residence for safekeeping until it will be sold.
Bryant Shock, a local business owner, said it was a rare find and he believes it will spark collectors' interest, resulting in driving the price up four or five times.
The nugget is more valuable in it's original form because it's a piece of history and if it is melted down, only the metal will make up it's value.

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered

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Lee Sansom, an HGV driver from Saltney, Chesire made the discovery of a lifetime while metal detecting with his father in a group of 20 metal detectorists on a field in Farndon. At first he thought it was just a piece of junk, but as he cleared more of the mud from the find he soon realized it was of ancient origin and far more significant value.

British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewellery was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valua…

Two rare Viking coins found in Northern Ireland

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Mr. Brian Morton, a full-time carer from Moneymore, was treasure hunting on a farmland in Newcastle, County Down when he discovered two rare Viking coins. These coins are a rare type of Hiberno-Manx, mainly circulated in the Isle of Man during the eleventh century and made of 93% silver.
It is the first of their kind to be found in Northen Ireland. Experts believe they may have been dispossessed during a Viking raid on a monastery at Maghera.

Vikings commenced their attacks on Ireland around 800 AD, where they stayed until 1169, up to the time of the Norman invasion. Taking in to consideration that the coins were found at a location with no significant landmark or indicator and 5 feet (1.5m) apart, it is suggested by a former coin curator at the Ulster Museum that they were dropped and not deliberately buried. The Belfast authorities officially declared the coins as a treasure and they have been sent to the British Museum for valuation. National Museums Northern Ireland and Uls…

Hidden trunk of World War 2 soldier found

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A trunk containing the perfectly preserved possesions and uniform of a Nazi German soldier fighting on the Eastern Front has been unearthed in Nevsky Pyatachok, Russia.
Among some of the possessions found in the trunk are alcohol, cigars, uniform, shoes and a wallet with German currency.
Historians will be working on determining who the owner is and tracking down their relatives. This can be difficult and time consuming task.
 Nazi Germany declared war on Russia and began it’s invasion, breaking a non-aggression pact.
This war on the Eastern Front lasted until 1945.













Bronze Roman statue ear found near Dere street

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A three inches (eight centimeters) long ear from a life size bronze Roman statue has been unearthed by a metal detectorist in the village of Brompton-on-Swale, close to a Roman fort and settlement Cataractonium, today known as Catterick, North Yorkshire and was confirmed to date back to 200AD (1800 years old). Experts believe it broke off during transport and was never recovered to be refitted. It is one of the oldest relics of its kind ever found in Britain, incredibly rare, very detailed and of high level craftmanship.   The find was made near Dere street, which is a road built by the ancient Romans, the A1 runs along side it today.
The Roman relic was documented with a recorder of archaeological objects found by members of the public named the Portable Antiquities Scheme.
 It was sold for £1100 on auction.

Medieval knight's longsword found in Poland

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Mr.Wojciech Kot from Mircze, Poland found an intact late medieval longsword in a peat bog. The find has been handed over to Stanislw Staszic Museum in Hrubieszów. The exact location of where it was found is kept secret.
The sword has a cruciform handle and missing its original hilt, which would have been made out of either, antler, wood or bone.
It is corroded due to the time spent buried in wetland, but intact from pommel to tip. Its excellent condition reveals that there are no signs of it deliberately discarded.


Mr. Bartłomiej Bartecki, director of Stanisław Staszic Museum in Hrubieszów said that it is possible that the knight was pulled into the mash or lost his sword in the peat bog. These items in original form had a surprisingly low weight of just 1.5 kilos (3.3 lbs) despite its size of 120 centimeters (4 feet) long.  The sword was an agile weapon for  knights in battle during the 14th century with its light weight, long reach and elongated grip for two-handed use.  A unique ma…

Jawbone with golden teeth found near Edward's Crossing

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Mr. Isaac Jones from Nevada City discovered half a jaw bone with three intact golden teeth while metal detecting near Edwards Crossing, a historic bridge which gold prospectors mining for gold in the area use to cross the Yuba River.

The remains have been turned over to Nevada County Sheriff. Captain Paul Schmitt said that they will be sending it to a forensic anthropologist. It can take up to 6 months for scientists to determine the age and if there is DNA or dental records.
It is possible that this could be the remains of an old miner or a missing person and may possibly bring closure to a grieving family.

Largest solidus coin hoard in the Netherlands uncovered.

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Mark Volleberg found 23 Roman gold coins while metal detecting on an orchard in Lienden, a village outside Buren in the central Dutch province of Gelderland. Metal detectorists Dik van Ommeren and Cees-Jan van de Pol also discovered eight gold coins on the same orchard in 2012.
Archival research revealed Roman gold has been found on the same property since 1840.  The land originally belonged to Baron van Brakell. Further finds were made in 1905 and again in 1916.  A total of 42 pieces were unearthed over the years there.
Unfortunately the whereabouts of the earlier found coins are unknown.
All are solidi which was a pure gold coin issued originally by Constantine in the late Roman Empire and then by following emperors and minted over more than 80 years, dating to the late 4th, early 5th century.  A diversity of time periods and emperors is not uncommon for late Roman solidus hoards. These coins were not in regular circulation because they were very valuable and worth years of pay fo…

Rare 400-year-old civil war pistol discovered on a beach.

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Mr. Tony Collins found a rare officer’s pistol dating from the civil war era in St Aubin's Bay, Jersey while metal detecting on the beach. The item was declared an important find by Mr. Neil Mahrer, the conservator at Jersey Heritage. Mr. Mahrer said that there has been a  lot of weapons found from later periods and this one is a unique find because it is the only one he has seen to date from the 17th  century and also in remarkably good condition with the metal still intact.
During that era, this specific weapon was very expensive and  complicated to make due to it’s special clockwork mechanism.



The black sand at the beach in St.Aubin’s Bay is low in oxygen content, hence the well preserved condition of the materials. The likely reason the weapon ended up buried under sand on the beach is that it was dropped by an officer while boarding a ship and later washed up on the shore.  The pistol is expected to go on display following X-Rays and a delicate conservation which involves c…

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