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Exceptionally rare gold coin worth 100k found in pristine condition

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A metal detector enthusiast made the discovery of a lifetime while searching on a freshly ploughed farm field near a historical Roman road in Dover, Kent.  As the 30-year-old detectorist removed the dirt from the shiny find, his initial reaction was that it must be a fake, as it was in absolute pristine condition.
Following authentication by the British Museum, it was confirmed that he found an exceptionally rare 24 carat Aureus coin, embellished with the face of Emperor Allectus who reigned during 293 AD, which dates it back to almost 2000 years ago.

The finder said 'At first I was quite skeptical of its authenticity because it was so shiny but when I realized what it could be potentially I just completely freaked out by it.'

The coin is approximately the size of a modern one penny and weighs 4.31 grams.  Displayed on one side is the head of Allectus and on the other, that of two captives kneeling at the feet of Apollo.

The only other known specimen of this coin in in the wo…

New discovery from the Benešov Superbolide found 20 years later

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Meteorite fragments from a famous Superbolide named Benešov, which occurred more than 20 years ago in the skies of the Czech Republic, has been discovered. These spectacular events are relatively rare and due to the force of the impact causing displacement during the collision and other natural causes like wind speed at the time the fragments enter the atmosphere, makes it difficult to pinpoint the exact location where they have fallen on Earth.The Benešov Superbolide was recorded by the European Fireball Network during systematic photographic observations and certainly produced multiple meteorite falls with thousands of fragments, but despite many attempts, none were found even years after the fall. The recent discovery was made possible when Mr. Pavel Spurný of the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and his colleagues used improved methods to analyze the records of the data of the event. With the revised trajectory they pin pointed a new impact …

Valentinian III gold coin and two gold rings found in Sweden

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A gold coin and two rings were found buried at Öland, an island and province of Sweden. It is considered a significant find, as it provides more insight on the history of the area, specifically a massacre which took place there in the 5th century.
Archaeologists Sophie Vallulv and Clara Alfsdotter said that it also confirms a theory that the island was acquainted with the Roman Empire.
The coin was minted in honor of Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III, who ruled between 425 and 455.
On one side of the coin is an image of the emperor resting his foot on the head of a barbarian. The other side contains an image of the head of the emperor.
The gold rings are mysterious, as they belonged to a woman, but all of the bodies uncovered in the area where that of men.
Helena Victor, the archaeology project leader said that the property where it was found may have belonged to a headman or minor king.
A large number of skeletons have been discovered all over the area, the bodies were not buried, just…

Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

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Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewelry.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Robert's friend, Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with him when he noticed him still on the same spot for more than an hour, consistently pulling large amounts of coins, which is very unusual.

The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.


He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search, it was found…

Hoard of 1000 coins dating back to English Civil War found in Lincolnshire

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A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a plowed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace.
The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell.
This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war.
A few smaller-scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington.
Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as monumenta…

"Mourning ring" with custom engraving found buried in Wales.

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Mr. Ron Pitman found a gold mourning ring while metal detecting on muddy, plowed farmland growing maize, in Gower, Wales.
The outside is engraved with a trellis-style pattern. Inside reads an inscription "prepared bee to follow me." These words serve as a reminder to be spiritually and mentally prepared, as death may arrive at any time.  It was a common practice during the 1600s to use an extra "e" in writing.
The use of mourning rings came in use during the Middle Ages and the height of their popularity was following the Great Plague of London in the 1660s.
The names and date of passing of the deceased were engraved by grieving loved ones. When setting up a will people would often provide instructions and leave money for the purpose of buying and engraving such rings.
In the case of the Gower ring, the name of the deceased in whose honor the ring was engraved is not known and it is possible that the "me" mentioned in the wording may refer to death itself.
The…

Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

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A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which was stolen during raids.


The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like these were…

Hoard of silver Arabic coins found in East Ukraine.

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Numerous silver coins which dates back to the Samanid Empire (819-999 AD) and other artifacts were discovered by a metal detectorist in North-East Ukraine at a site by the Psel river in Sumy Oblast.

Silver fittings, which are remains of a belt were also found with the coins and it is believed that the coins were kept in a bag or some kind of purse, attached to the belt.  The coins are silver dirhams which were minted in the Samanid Empire, a Sunni Iranian empire, surrounding Afghanistan, and parts of Iran, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and between 819-999 AD.


Hoard of Roman coins unearthed under an old tree.

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A hoard of over 200 Roman silver and bronze coins was unearthed in the central part of Mezdra, Bulgaria. The hoard was found under the roots of an old plum tree, during the clearing of a property belonging to sisters Neli and Petq Krustevi.
While removing the tree, the top of an old ceramic pot became visible. One of the workers attempted to remove the pot from the ground, but it broke because of it's fragile material and the ancient coins spilled out. The property owners have collected the coins with all pieces of the ceramic pot and reported it to the local museum.
Experts concluded that the coins are Roman Denarius and Antoninianus with various denomination and predominantly of silver content. Most dates from 1st century AD.



Exceptionally rare Early Medieval crucifix discovered.

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Mr. Tom Redmayne from Lincolnshire discovered a very rare ancient crucifix while metal detecting on a field in Skidbrooke.
The item has been evaluated to date from the Early Medieval age (AD950-1150).
Cast in lead alloy, it is described as 26.36mm in height, 18.7mm in width, with a weight of 4.01 grams. A dent on the top suggests it had a suspension loop.
The crucifix displays Christ on the cross with three emphasized dots on the torso, which experts believe may represent the Holy Trinity.
According to archaeologist Adam Daubney, from Lincolnshire County Council, only one other near identical, almost-complete piece was found on August 2015 in Swinhope.
Mr. Daubney also said the crucifix was likely designed in England from a Scandinavian prototype, but made overseas and tells us something about cross-channel trade and religion during that era.

Mr. Redmayne said when he found the item, he guessed it was possibly ancient, due to its unrefined design, but did not initially realize the discovery…

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

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37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags was buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings. The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.   Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong-shaped disc a…

18 Ounce gold nugget worth more than $70000 found

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Oscar Espinoza, of Modesto, California was out with his metal detector in a woods creek in Jamestown when he struck gold.  He uncovered an 18-ounce nugget. The estimated value is $70,000.  The find has been placed somewhere away from his residence for safekeeping until it will be sold.
Bryant Shock, a local business owner, said it was a rare find and he believes it will spark collectors' interest, resulting in driving the price up four or five times.
The nugget is more valuable in its original form because it's a piece of history and if it is melted down, only the metal will make up its value.

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered

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British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back, it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewelry was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valuation by the British Museum.  Half of the money will be paid to Mr. Sansom and the other half to the landowner of the field where it was found.

Two rare Viking coins found in Northern Ireland

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Mr. Brian Morton, a full-time carer from Moneymore, was treasure hunting on a farmland in Newcastle, County Down when he discovered two rare Viking coins. These coins are a rare type of Hiberno-Manx, mainly circulated in the Isle of Man during the eleventh century and made of 93% silver.
It is the first of their kind to be found in Northen Ireland. Experts believe they may have been dispossessed during a Viking raid on a monastery at Maghera.

Vikings commenced their attacks on Ireland around 800 AD, where they stayed until 1169, up to the time of the Norman invasion. Taking into consideration that the coins were found at a location with no significant landmark or indicator and 5 feet (1.5m) apart, it is suggested by a former coin curator at the Ulster Museum that they were dropped and not deliberately buried. The Belfast authorities officially declared the coins as a treasure and they have been sent to the British Museum for valuation. National Museums Northern Ireland and Ulster Museum…