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Talisman for warding off evil spirits in Middle Ages found in Norfolk

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A  silver gilt cross with size 14mm by 12mm (0.5in by 0.4in) from the 15th Century was recently found by a metal detectorist near Wramplingham in Norfolk.

During the Middle Ages, a feared disease named  St Anthony's Fire, affecting both humans and livestock, which caused dreadful symptoms developed in Europe and soon became
widespread.
It was initially believed to be the cause of bewitchment, therefore supersticious people would wear a talisman in the form of a cross in an attempt to ward off the evil spirits.

Norfolk's finds liaison officer for the county's Historic Environment Service, Julie Shoemark said that the symptoms were, amongst others, mania, convulsions, skin lesions and in
the progressive stage, gangrene.

The name St.Anthony's Fire came about after the disease broke out in France and hospitals were specially erected to treat victims. Gaston de la Valloire a nobleman of the Dauphiné,
was the founder of these hospitals and dedicated them to Saint Anthony (c…

Rare and valuable pendant of high quality gold found in Norfolk

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Mr. Godfrey Pratt from Norfolk made a rare and valuable discovery on a field near Attleborough,with his metal detector.  At first he thought it may be just a golden bottle cap, but upon uncovering it more,  discovered a pendant made of high quality gold in a good condidition, dating back to the 6th Century.
Made more than 1,500 years ago, this early Anglo-Saxon pendant features the image of Emperor Justinian as it appeared on Byzantine coin. 
Finds officer Dr. Adrian Marsden from Norwich Castle Museum said it was originally made in France, may have come to England as result of an export trade at the time and that the jewellery likely had a special significance to the owner and was buried with them.
It could possibly indicate a cemetery on the field where it was found and Mr. Pratt joined a search project lead by a team from the Norfolk Heritage Recovery Group.
The pendant is due for valuation by the British museum, following evaluation by the coroner, after which Mr. Pratt will be r…

New discovery from the Benešov Superbolide found 20 years later

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Meteorite fragments from a famous Superbolide named Benešov, which occured more than 20 years ago in the skies of the Czech Republic, has been discovered. These spectacular events are relatively rare and due to the force of the impact causing displacement during the collusion and other natural causes like wind speed at the time the fragments enter the atmosphere, makes it difficult to pin point the exact location where they have fallen on Earth.The Benešov Superbolide was recorded by the European Fireball Network during systematic photographic observations and certainly produced multiple meteorite fall with thousands of fragments, but despite many attempts, none were found even years after the fall.The recent discovery was made possible when mr. Pavel Spurný of the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and his colleagues used improved methods to analyze the records of the data of the event. With revised trajectory they pin pointed a new impact locat…

Valentinian III gold coin and two gold rings found in Sweden

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A gold coin and two rings were found buried at Öland, an island and province of Sweden. It is considered a significant find, as it provides more insight on the history of the area, specifically a massacre which took place there in the 5th century.
Archaeologists Sophie Vallulv and Clara Alfsdotter said that it also confirms a theory that the island was acquainted with the Roman Empire.
The coin was minted in honour of Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III, who ruled between 425 and 455.
On one side of the coin is an image of the emperor resting his foot on the head of a barbarian. The other side contains an image of the head of the emperor.
The gold rings are mysterious, as they belonged to a woman, but all of the bodies uncovered in the area where that of men.
Helena Victor, the archaeology project leader said that the property where it was found may have belonged to a headman or minor king.
A large number of skeletons have been discovered all over the area, the bodies were not buri…

Beachcomber discovers mysterious hoard of more than 100 foreign coins

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Robert Hodsdon from Galveston regularly metal detects on the local beach and usually makes the typical finds like a few bottle caps, some coins and the odd jewellery.
One day he made a mysterious discovery of more than 100 various foreign coins buried under the sand.
He says that while swinging his metal detector it made several beeps and he was sure it was just a coin spill which got lost.
Clyde Longworth was searching for items on the beach with Hodsdon when he noticed he was still on the same spot for more than an hour, pulling handfuls of coins, which is very unusual.
The find was made on the front of the eastern sea well where they have searched many times without uncovering foreign coins.
It soon became evident that the discovery was not a coincidence. The coins originated from Australia, India, Fiji,  and several European countries.


He believed the coins were stolen and planned on returning them to their owner.  Following an Internet search it was found that days prior, Peter …

Hoard of 1000 coins dating back to English Civil War found

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A trove of 1000 coins dating back almost 400 years to the English Civil war (1642 - 1651) was discovered buried in a ploughed agricultural field in Ewerby, Lincolnshire by Mr. Steven Ingram. The landowner, Mr. Chris Sardeson, farmed there for over 50 years without noticing a trace.
The English Civil War was a battle between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Several battles commenced in Lincolnshire, amongst others at Ancaster Heath, Riby Gap. The most significant of which took place on October 1643 at Winceby where the Royalists were defeated by the parliamentarian army, as well as Oliver Cromwell.
This defeat marked the end of the Royalist movement in Lincolnshire. Following this, the Parliamentarians remained in power of the county until the end of the war.
A few smaller scale battles were also led by the Royalist garrison, one was in 1644 at Waddington.
Finds officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme at Lincolnshire County Council, Dr Adam Daubney, describes the find as m…

106 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

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A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.


Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extreme cold climate has assisted in preventing it to spoil.
It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake alo…