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Thomas Cromwell's 'love ring' discovered by treasure hunter banked £35,000

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A beautiful gold 15th Century ring was found by a metal detectorist near Laude Abbey in Leicestershire. It was found on the land which was owned by the late Thomas Cromwell, who was Henry VIII's advisor.


The striking piece of jewelry represents an early example of a love ring, worn by the wife of married partners, the bond between them symbolized with two natural gems embedded on the front and surrounded by a decoration which may be the representation of flower petals. 
The sides are engraved with leaf patterns.  The dimensions are 19 mm in diameter and 10 mm wide at bezel with a weight of 5.71 grams.  The land where the ring was discovered is now a Christian retreat and conference center and the finder was privileged to receive permission to search the area.



In historical days, the land was initially owned by wealthy Augustinian Priory since the 12th century.  Thomas Cromwell was surveying for land to settle on and found the location with its stunning surroundings impressive. He took…

Interesting early Medieval golden fitting discovered in North Yorkshire declared a treasure

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A gold fitting dating back to the Early Medieval times (AD 800 - AD 900) which was discovered by a metal detectorist in a cultivated farm field in Hambleton, North Yorkshire has been declared a treasure.

It was noted that this find is interesting and to some extent unidentified, as no identical object has ever been discovered before and believed to be a fitting as it features a suspension loop, however, the exact use has not been determined.  Made mainly of pure gold with two blue glass studs representing eyes with a length of 22.5 mm and weight of 3.72 g.
The item has been designed to represent an animal head and made with skilled craftsmanship in a three-dimensional form with the top of the suspension loop attachment concealed by the jaw.
The exact function of this remarkable fitting is a mystery although similar known objects dating back to mid-to-late 9th century Anglo-Saxon exists. 
The ears of this golden animal fittings are quite exceptional which seems to be intended not to be dec…

109 year old fruit cake in its original packaging belonging to Robert Falcon Scott found

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A fruitcake dating back to 1910, still neatly wrapped in paper and in its original metal tin packaging has been found.
It is believed that the cake was brought to Antarctica by British Royal Navy Captain, Robert Falcon Scott.
In 1910 he embarked on an expedition named Terra Nova, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Research for the purpose of scientific and geographical exploration. In documentation about the expedition, it mentions the exact same brand of fruit cake from Huntley & Palmers as the one which was found.


Manager of the Antartic Heritage Trust, Lizzie Meek, describes the cake as extremely well preserved, even though the metal tin containing it has deteriorated. It has just a very slight rancid butter smell, but other than that smells and looks edible. 
Alcohol and sugar are both natural preservatives and the extremely cold climate have assisted in preventing it to spoil.


It is also known that explorers of the Antartic region in present days like to take fruit cake alon…

Love ring from the Tudor Era reunited with it's second half 3 year later

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A metal detectorist couple has united a 450-year-old silver love ring with its second half 3 years after finding the first. 
The partial artifact was discovered in Lancashire and inscribed on it is the word "Yours". Love rings during the TudorEra, were inscribed with a variety of different messages, therefore the options of what the complete meaning may be, was endless.
The metal detecting pair, Sheila and Iain, who has been treasure hunting for 12 years, was searching again on the same field 3 years later when they uncovered the second half of the ring. When the pieces were placed together, it read "I am yours". Sheila said that the ring is tiny and beautifully decorated with elegant letters. It forms a small part of the history of the area. As the field on which the ring was discovered is plowed yearly, it is possible that the plow may have broken it in half. Whoever the misfortunate lover is who lost their ring will remain a mystery, buried in time.



2,800 year old gold jewellery of royal origin found in Kazakhstan

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Some 3, 000 golden and precious items were found buried in a burial mound in a remote area at Tarbagatai mountains in Kazakhstan. It is estimated that the burial took place around 2,800 years ago and at that time the Saka people were residing there. The type of gold jewelry and other items which were found would have belonged to Royal or elite members of the Saka people. An expert explained that the grave is that of a couple who may have been a part of those who reigned at that point in time.




Among the finds are earrings in the shape of bells, gold plates with rivets, plaques, chains, and a necklace with precious stones.  
Gold beads were used to decorate clothing and were manufactured with a sophisticated micro-soldering technique which was developed by the locals and demonstrates exceptional artistic skill.



The discovery provides an interesting view of the history of the people who resided in Kazakstan during that time period. They clearly had expertise in developing sophisticated tech…

Unique, perfectly preserved treasure of 300 gold coins worth millions of Euros discovered in Italy

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A soapstone pot containing 300 gold coins dating back to 5th century AD has been found in the town of Como, near Milan, Italy following a search under a long-abandoned theater. The Cressoni Theater was opened in 1870 and abandoned in 1997.
New owners of the land on which the theater stands plan to demolish the old building and replace it with luxury residences. The pot with gold coins, along with a gold bar and two other objects which are currently in a process of being identified were discovered in the basement of the theater. The pot itself is a significant find, as it is a unique design, never seen before.
The coins were packed into little stacks and with time latches together, therefore needs to be carefully separated. 27 coins have been successfully separated and all dates to the 5th century, from the reign of Emperors Honorius, Valentinian III, Leo I the Thracian and Libius Severus.


During that era, there was little currency flow in the Roman economic system which makes t…

Kaliakra treasure of Bulgaria likely buried by Tatar commander

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Kaliakra Fortress is located on the coast of the Black Sea in northern Bulgaria. It is of Byzantine Greek origin. In modern days tourists can view the ruins of the once magnificent fortress and remains of unstable history.


The floor of an old house, which was built directly on the ruins of ancient buildings, dating back to the Middle Ages was discovered nearby and hidden underneath it, a clay pot with coins, jewelry and other valuables was found.



The soil inside the pot was carefully removed and the contents revealed: 873 gold and silver coins, 11 fittings and buckles, 28 silver and bronze buttons, several gold earrings, a gold ring and metal and four gold beads studded with gems.  A total of 957 objects.


The coins are mostly Ottoman and the rest Bulgarian issues. Most of the Ottoman coins are from the reign of Sultan Bayazid Yildirum (1389-1402). The rest are older and dates to the reign of his predecessor Murad I (1362-1389)
A large percentage of the Bulgarian coins were minted under th…

Oldest golden coin discovered in Slovenia first of a very rare type Alexander the Great stater

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A field in Bela Krajina, which was initially farmland, delivered a surprise find of an extremely rare golden Celtic coin dating back to 3rd century BC, which has only been found elsewhere in Europe before.  
It was attached to a bronze belt which was not intact enough to restore, but organic material preserved on the belt could potentially provide the possibility of carbon dating. The condition of the coin itself is well preserved.
Ceramics and iron weapons found in close proximity initially indicates the date to be around 3rd century BC.



It is the oldest coin found in Slovenia and a Celtic imitation of an Alexander the Great stater which features on one side an image of the goddess Nike and the other that of Athena.  
Celtic tribes brought the concept of using Staters as currency to Western and Central Europe, following their service as mercenaries in north Greece.  Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs imitated the staters of Philip II of Macedonia, which found their way to …

Gold 15th century bishop's ring valued at £10 000 found in Yorkshire

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Adam Day is a 30-year-old metal detecting enthusiast from Yorkshire.  He recently started a metal detecting hobby and is considered to be an amateur treasure hunter.  Never did he consider his newfound hobby would bring him fame and fortune so soon.


During a search on a farmer's plowed field near Beverley Minster in Yorkshire, he came upon an amazing discovery, a 15th-century bishop's ring made of 20-carat gold.  He recalls the moment when first looking at the ring he just pulled out of the ground and realized it was of significant value and says that he was shaking at the thought of what special piece of jewelry was right there in his hands.

The gold ring is skillfully crafted and engraved with St George and St.Catherine as well as several decorative floral emblems. Since Beverley Minster is close to the location where the artifact was discovered, it is believed that it belonged in the distant past to a bishop from the local church. It has been dated  to between 1450-1550.'…

Farmer receives €773,000 for discovery of bronze horse head which rewrote history

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A search of a farmer's land in Lahnau, Germany became very interesting when lots of bronze fragments were uncovered, the trail of buried fragments lead to a 36-foot well in which a bronze horse head, life-sized, weighing 28 pounds, covered with gold and adorned with golden leaves were found. 
The year 9 A.D marked the event of an ambush from German warriors on three legions of Roman soldiers led by general Publius Quinctilius Varus. The Germans destroyed their enemies, the surviving Romans retreated and set up a northern perimeter along the Rhine River. It was believed that prior to this event, Germans and Romans did not live alongside each other and did not trade either. However, along with the bronze horse head, a complete Roman settlement, dating back to 4 B.C, covering approximately 20 acres with no military buildings and no signs of battle, shows that the Romans were living next to and traded peacefully with Germans for years, right up until the Teutoburg defeat. 
It is be…