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Celtic brooch dating back to the Viking age found in Norway.

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A bronze Celtic brooch, dating back to the 9th century was found by a man metal detecting on Agdenes farm at the south end of Trondheim Fjord, mid-Norway. Experts believe it was made in a Celtic workshop, but stolen during the Viking raids in Ireland.
It is in pristine condition and features a bird figure that has two “wings” with patterns representing a dolphin or fish. These patterns reveal the date which the object was made. It was tradition for middle to lower class Viking women to be buried in a traditional dress and often jewelry which were stolen during raids.


The location where the brooch was found has been mentioned a number of times in Norse sagas as a place where warriors gathered prior to sailing off to continue their journey towards the British Isles.

Aina Margrethe Heen Pettersen, a doctoral student at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Historical Studies provides interesting insight about the find. She says brooches like thes…

Hoard of silver Arabic coins found in East Ukraine.

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Numerous silver coins which dates back to the Samanid Empire (819-999 AD) and other artefacts were discovered by a metal detectorist in North-East Ukraine at a site by the Psel river in Sumy Oblast.

Silver fittings, which are remains of a belt were also found with the coins and it is believed that the coins were kept in a bag or some kind of purse, attached to the belt.  The coins are silver dirhams which were minted in the Samanid Empire, a Sunni Iranian empire, surrounding Afghanistan, and parts of Iran, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and between 819-999 AD.


Hoard of Roman coins unearthed under an old tree.

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A hoard of over 200 Roman silver and bronze coins was unearthed in the central part of Mezdra, Bulgaria. The hoard was found under the roots of an old plum tree, during clearing of a property belonging to sisters Neli and Petq Krustevi.
While removing the tree, the top of an old ceramic pot became visible. One of the workers attempted to remove the pot from the ground, but it broke because of it's fragile material and the ancient coins spilled out. The property owners have collected the coins with all pieces of the ceramic pot and reported it to the local museum.
Experts concluded that the coins are Roman Denarius and Antoninianus with various denomination and predominantly of silver content. Most dates from 1st century AD.



Exceptionally rare Early Medieval crucifix discovered.

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Mr. Tom Redmayne from Lincolnshire discovered a very rare ancient crucifix while metal detecting on a field in Skidbrooke.
The item has been evaluated to date from the Early Medieval age (AD950-1150).
Cast in lead alloy, it is described as 26.36mm in height, 18.7mm in width, with a weight of 4.01 grams. A dent on the top suggests it had a suspension loop.
The crucifix displays Christ on the cross with three emphasized dots on the torso, which experts believe may represent the Holy Trinity.
According to archaeologist Adam Daubney, from Lincolnshire County Council, only one other near identical, almost-complete piece was found on August 2015 in Swinhope.
Mr. Daubney also said the crucifix was likely designed in England from a Scandinavian prototype, but made overseas and tells us something about cross-channel trade and religion during that era.

Mr. Redmayne said when he found the item, he guessed it was possibly ancient, due to it's unrefined design, but did not initially realize t…

Mystery of 14 000 World War identity tags found hidden in a field.

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37-year-old Dan Mackay made an astonishing discovery while relic hunting in a field near London, where a remaining Second World War anti-aircraft battery is located.
Mysteriously, a large hoard of more than 14,000 identity tags were buried which belonged to soldiers who served in the war, among others, those who have fallen during the Normandy landings. The site where the discs were found is close to a discontinued factory where they were manufactured.   Identity Tags, commonly named Dog Tags, due to their resemblance to actual dog tags, were first introduced in 1907 to replace identity cards, by the British Army and in September 1916, during the First World war, Army Order 287 introduced the compulsory issue of two official tags for each soldier by the British Army, both were initially manufactured of vulcanized asbestos fiber due to the comfort of wearing the material during warm climates.  From 1960 stainless steel was used.
The first tag was a shade of green color, oblong shaped …

18 Ounce gold nugget worth more than $70000 found

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Oscar Espinoza, of Modesto, California was out with his metal detector in a woods creek in Jamestown when he struck gold.  He uncovered an 18 ounce nugget. The estimated value is $70,000.  The find has been placed somewhere away from his residence for safekeeping until it will be sold.
Bryant Shock, a local business owner, said it was a rare find and he believes it will spark collectors' interest, resulting in driving the price up four or five times.
The nugget is more valuable in it's original form because it's a piece of history and if it is melted down, only the metal will make up it's value.

2000-year-old Roman Pendant discovered

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Lee Sansom, an HGV driver from Saltney, Chesire made the discovery of a lifetime while metal detecting with his father in a group of 20 metal detectorists on a field in Farndon. At first he thought it was just a piece of junk, but as he cleared more of the mud from the find he soon realized it was of ancient origin and far more significant value.

British Museum curator Richard Hobbs said the silver Roman pendant is a very rare and valuable find.  It dates back 2000 years and is set in an orange carnelian stone, engraved on the front is a fallen soldier or gladiator holding a shield towards what appears to be a large feline, likely to be a Panther.
At the back it features five circular cuts in the shape of a cross. Experts believe it belonged to someone wealthy.
A large Roman military garrison was stationed once in Chester and the jewellery was found outside the city walls.  The pendant has been ruled a treasure and will be on display at The Grosvenor Museum in Chester following valua…